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dc.contributor.authorDunn, Elizabeth W.
dc.contributor.authorAknin, Lara B.
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Michael Irwin
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-21T17:52:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-21
dc.identifier.citationDunn, Elizabeth W., Lara B. Aknin, and Michael I. Norton. "Prosocial Spending and Happiness: Using Money to Benefit Others Pays Off." Current Directions in Psychological Science (forthcoming).en_US
dc.identifier.issn0963-7214en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11189976
dc.description.abstractWhile a great deal of research has shown that people with more money are somewhat happier than people with less money, our research demonstrates that how people spend their money also matters for their happiness. In particular, both correlational and experimental studies show that people who spend money on others report greater happiness. The benefits of such prosocial spending emerge among adults around the world, and the warm glow of giving can be detected even in toddlers. These benefits are most likely to emerge when giving satisfies one or more core human needs (relatedness, competence, and autonomy). The rewards of prosocial spending are observable in both the brain and the body and can potentially be harnessed by organizations and governments.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dash.licenseOAP
dc.subjectmoneyen_US
dc.subjectprosocial spendingen_US
dc.subjecthappinessen_US
dc.subjectwell-beingen_US
dc.titleProsocial Spending and Happiness: Using Money to Benefit Others Pays Offen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAuthor's Originalen_US
dc.relation.journalCurrent Directions in Psychological Scienceen_US
dash.depositing.authorNorton, Michael Irwin
dc.date.available2013-10-21T17:52:12Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0963721413512503
dash.contributor.affiliatedNorton, Michael


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