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dc.contributor.authorGersen, Jacob E.
dc.contributor.authorPosner, Eric
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-04T16:41:35Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationJacob E. Gersen & Eric A. Posner, Timing Rules and Legal Institutions, 121 Harv. L. Rev. 543 (2007).en_US
dc.identifier.issn0017-811Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11350520
dc.description.abstractConstitutional and legislative restrictions on the timing of legislation and regulation are ubiquitous, but these “timing rules” have received little attention in the legal literature. Yet the timing of a law can be just as important as its content. The timing of a law determines whether its benefits are created sooner or later. This determines how the costs and benefits are spread across time, and hence how they are distributed to the advantage or disadvantage of different private groups, citizens, and governmental officials. We argue that timing rules are, and should be, used to reduce agency problems within the legislature and between the legislature and the public, and to mitigate deliberative pathologies.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherHarvard University, Harvard Law Schoolen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.harvardlawreview.org/media/pdf/gersen_posner.pdfen_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1002724en_US
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.law.uchicago.edu/files/files/347.pdfen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleTiming Rules and Legal Institutionsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalHarvard Law Reviewen_US
dash.depositing.authorGersen, Jacob E.
dash.embargo.until10000-01-01
dash.contributor.affiliatedGersen, Jacob


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