TIM-family Proteins Promote Infection of Multiple Enveloped Viruses through Virion-associated Phosphatidylserine

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TIM-family Proteins Promote Infection of Multiple Enveloped Viruses through Virion-associated Phosphatidylserine

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Title: TIM-family Proteins Promote Infection of Multiple Enveloped Viruses through Virion-associated Phosphatidylserine
Author: Jemielity, Stephanie; Wang, Jinyize J.; Chan, Ying Kai; Ahmed, Asim Aminsharif; Li, Wenhui; Monahan, Sheena; Bu, Xia; Farzan, Michael; Freeman, Gordon James; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Choe, Hyeryun

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Citation: Jemielity, Stephanie, Jinyize J. Wang, Ying Kai Chan, Asim A. Ahmed, Wenhui Li, Sheena Monahan, Xia Bu, et al. 2013. Tim-family proteins promote infection of multiple enveloped viruses through virion-associated phosphatidylserine. PLoS Pathogens 9(3): e1003232.
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Abstract: Human T-cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin-domain containing proteins (TIM1, 3, and 4) specifically bind phosphatidylserine (PS). TIM1 has been proposed to serve as a cellular receptor for hepatitis A virus and Ebola virus and as an entry factor for dengue virus. Here we show that TIM1 promotes infection of retroviruses and virus-like particles (VLPs) pseudotyped with a range of viral entry proteins, in particular those from the filovirus, flavivirus, New World arenavirus and alphavirus families. TIM1 also robustly enhanced the infection of replication-competent viruses from the same families, including dengue, Tacaribe, Sindbis and Ross River viruses. All interactions between TIM1 and pseudoviruses or VLPs were PS-mediated, as demonstrated with liposome blocking and TIM1 mutagenesis experiments. In addition, other PS-binding proteins, such as Axl and TIM4, promoted infection similarly to TIM1. Finally, the blocking of PS receptors on macrophages inhibited the entry of Ebola VLPs, suggesting that PS receptors can contribute to infection in physiologically relevant cells. Notably, infection mediated by the entry proteins of Lassa fever virus, influenza A virus and SARS coronavirus was largely unaffected by TIM1 expression. Taken together our data show that TIM1 and related PS-binding proteins promote infection of diverse families of enveloped viruses, and may therefore be useful targets for broad-spectrum antiviral therapies.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1003232
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3610696/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11361903
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