The Diseconomies of Queue Pooling: An Empirical Investigation of Emergency Department Length of Stay

DSpace/Manakin Repository

The Diseconomies of Queue Pooling: An Empirical Investigation of Emergency Department Length of Stay

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: The Diseconomies of Queue Pooling: An Empirical Investigation of Emergency Department Length of Stay
Author: Song, Hummy; Tucker, Anita Lynn; Murrell, Karen L.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Song, Hummy, Anita L. Tucker, and Karen L. Murrell. "The Diseconomies of Queue Pooling: An Empirical Investigation of Emergency Department Length of Stay". Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 14-050, December 2013.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: We conduct an empirical investigation of the impact of two different queue management systems on throughput times. Using an Emergency Department’s (ED) patient-level data (N = 231,081) from 2007 to 2010, we find that patients’ lengths of stay (LOS) were longer when physicians were assigned patients under a pooled queuing system, compared to when each physician operated under a dedicated queuing system. The dedicated queuing system resulted in a 10 percent decrease in LOS—a 32-minute reduction in LOS for an average patient of medium severity in this ED. We propose that the dedicated queuing system yielded shorter throughput times because it provided physicians with greater ability and incentive to manage their patients’ flow through the ED from arrival to discharge. Consistent with social loafing theory, our analysis shows that patients were treated and discharged at a faster rate in the dedicated queuing system than in the pooled queuing system. We conduct additional analyses to rule out alternate explanations, such as stinting on care and decreased quality of care. Our paper has implications for health care organizations and others seeking to reduce throughput time, resource utilization, and costs.
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11591702
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters