Tracking progression of patient state of health in critical care using inferred shared dynamics in physiological time series

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Tracking progression of patient state of health in critical care using inferred shared dynamics in physiological time series

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Title: Tracking progression of patient state of health in critical care using inferred shared dynamics in physiological time series
Author: Lehman, Li-Wei; Nemati, Shamim; Adams, Ryan Prescott; Moody, George; Malhotra, Atul; Mark, Rodger G.

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Citation: Lehman, Li-wei H., Shamim Nemati, Ryan P. Adams, George Moody, Atul Malhotra, and Roger G. Mark. 2013. “Tracking progression of patient state of health in critical care using inferred shared dynamics in physiological time series.” In 2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 7072-7075. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.
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Abstract: Physiologic systems generate complex dynamics in their output signals that reflect the changing state of the underlying control systems. In this work, we used a switching vector autoregressive (switching VAR) framework to systematically learn and identify a collection of vital sign dynamics, which can possibly be recurrent within the same patient and shared across the entire cohort. We show that these dynamical behaviors can be used to characterize and elucidate the progression of patients' states of health over time. Using the mean arterial blood pressure time series of 337 ICU patients during the first 24 hours of their ICU stays, we demonstrated that the learned dynamics from as early as the first 8 hours of patients' ICU stays can achieve similar hospital mortality prediction performance as the well-known SAPS-I acuity scores, suggesting that the discovered latent dynamics structure may yield more timely insights into the progression of a patient's state of health than the traditional snapshot-based acuity scores.
Published Version: doi:10.1109/EMBC.2013.6611187
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11591710
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