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dc.contributor.authorLenert, L. A.
dc.contributor.authorMorss, S.
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, M. K.
dc.contributor.authorBergen, M. R.
dc.contributor.authorFaustman, W. O.
dc.contributor.authorGarber, Alan M
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T22:03:53Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifierQuick submit: 2013-12-19T21:31:35-05:00
dc.identifier.citationLenert, L. A., S. Morss, M. K. Goldstein, M. R. Bergen, W. O. Faustman, and Alan M. Garber. 1997. Measurement of the validity of utility elicitations performed by computerized interview. Medical Care 35, 9:915-920.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0025-7079en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11595744
dc.description.abstractObjectives. The authors evaluate a measure of the validity of utility elicitations and study the potential effects of invalid elicitations on population utility values. Methods. The authors used a computerized survey to describe and measure preferences for three common side-effects of anti-psychotic drugs (tardive dyskinesia [TD], akathesia [AKA], pseudo-parkinsonism). The authors compared the validity of elicitations in 41 healthy volunteers to 22 schizophrenic patients. Preferences were measured using visual analog scale (VAS), pair-wise comparison (PWC), and the Standard Gamble (SG) methods. To assess the validity of each groups' responses, the authors compared the consistency of subjects' rank-order of the desirability of states across methods of preferences assessment (CAMPA). Results. All healthy volunteers and 82% of patients completed the computer survey; of these subjects, 97% of healthy volunteers and 70% of patients indicated they thought they understood the task required of them. However, only 78% of healthy subjects and 44% of patients had a consistent rank ordering of preferences among VAS and PWC ratings; only 80% and 61%, respectively, had a consistent rank ordering preferences among SG and PWC ratings. For two of the three health states, inconsistent subjects had statistically higher SG utilities (for TD, 0.94 versus 0.87, and for AKA 0.92 versus 0.86; P<0.05) Conclusions. The CAMPA test can identify potentially invalid preference ratings. Potentially invalid preference ratings may bias the "population" utilities for health states.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLippincott-Raven Publishersen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1097/00005650-199709000-00004en_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/3767456en_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.titleMeasurement of the validity of utility elicitations performed by computerized interviewen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2013-12-20T02:32:55Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.rights.holderLenert LA; Morss S; Goldstein MK; Bergen MR; Faustman WO; Garber AM
dc.relation.journalMedical Careen_US
dash.depositing.authorGarber, Alan M
dash.embargo.until10000-01-01
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/00005650-199709000-00004*
workflow.legacycommentsFLAG2: Cannot use published version. Must obtain author's submitted manuscript.en_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedGarber, Alan


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