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dc.contributor.authorVanderVeen, Deborah K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Camilia R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMehendale, Reshmaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAllred, Elizabeth N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDammann, Olafen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeviton, Alanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-13T19:01:06Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationVanderVeen, Deborah K., Camilia R. Martin, Reshma Mehendale, Elizabeth N. Allred, Olaf Dammann, and Alan Leviton. 2013. “Early Nutrition and Weight Gain in Preterm Newborns and the Risk of Retinopathy of Prematurity.” PLoS ONE 8 (5): e64325. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064325. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0064325.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11708560
dc.description.abstractObjective: To identify nutritional and weight gain limitations associated with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) severity among very preterm newborns. Patients and Methods 1180 infants <28 weeks GA at birth with ROP examination results were grouped and analyzed by quartile of weekly total calorie, carbohydrate, protein, and lipid intake, as well as growth velocity between postnatal days 7 and 28 (adjusted for GA and birth weight Z-score). ROP was categorized by development of no, mild (<prethreshold), type 2, or type 1 ROP, as well as markers of ROP severity including stage 3 ROP, zone 1 disease, and plus disease. Associations between nutritional intake and ROP severity were compared. Results: Greater risk for Type 1 ROP (risk/95% confidence intervals) was found for infants with lowest quartile receipt of lipids (2.1/1.1, 3.8), total calories (2.2/1.4, 3.6), and carbohydrates (1.7/1.1, 2.9). Development of zone 1 ROP was associated with lipid or total calorie intake in the lowest quartile, and development of stage 3 ROP was associated with lowest quartile of total calorie intake. Growth velocity in the lowest quartile was associated with increased risk of any ROP, including type 1 ROP. Conclusion: The risk of developing severe ROP in extremely premature infants might be reduced by improving nutritional support, specifically targeting lipids and total calories, and perhaps by improving weight gain.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064325en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3667175/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectClinical Research Designen
dc.subjectCohort Studiesen
dc.subjectProspective Studiesen
dc.subjectDiagnostic Medicineen
dc.subjectPathologyen
dc.subjectGeneral Pathologyen
dc.subjectBiomarkersen
dc.subjectNutritionen
dc.subjectOphthalmologyen
dc.subjectPediatric Ophthalmologyen
dc.subjectRetinal Disordersen
dc.subjectPediatricsen
dc.subjectPublic Healthen
dc.subjectChild Healthen
dc.titleEarly Nutrition and Weight Gain in Preterm Newborns and the Risk of Retinopathy of Prematurityen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorVanderVeen, Deborah K.en_US
dc.date.available2014-02-13T19:01:06Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0064325*
dash.contributor.affiliatedMartin, Camilia
dash.contributor.affiliatedVanderveen, Deborah
dash.contributor.affiliatedAllred, Elizabeth
dash.contributor.affiliatedLeviton, Alan


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