Associations between purine metabolites and monoamine neurotransmitters in first-episode psychosis

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Associations between purine metabolites and monoamine neurotransmitters in first-episode psychosis

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Title: Associations between purine metabolites and monoamine neurotransmitters in first-episode psychosis
Author: Yao, Jeffrey K.; Dougherty, George G.; Reddy, Ravinder D.; Matson, Wayne R.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

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Citation: Yao, Jeffrey K., George G. Dougherty, Ravinder D. Reddy, Wayne R. Matson, Rima Kaddurah-Daouk, and Matcheri S. Keshavan. 2013. “Associations between purine metabolites and monoamine neurotransmitters in first-episode psychosis.” Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience 7 (1): 90. doi:10.3389/fncel.2013.00090. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fncel.2013.00090.
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Abstract: Schizophrenia (SZ) is a biochemically complex disorder characterized by widespread defects in multiple metabolic pathways whose dynamic interactions, until recently, have been difficult to examine. Rather, evidence for these alterations has been collected piecemeal, limiting the potential to inform our understanding of the interactions amongst relevant biochemical pathways. We herein review perturbations in purine and neurotransmitter metabolism observed in early SZ using a metabolomic approach. Purine catabolism is an underappreciated, but important component of the homeostatic response of mitochondria to oxidant stress. We have observed a homeostatic imbalance of purine catabolism in first-episode neuroleptic-naïve patients with SZ (FENNS). Precursor and product relationships within purine pathways are tightly correlated. Although some of these correlations persist across disease or medication status, others appear to be lost among FENNS suggesting that steady formation of the antioxidant uric acid (UA) via purine catabolism is altered early in the course of illness. As is the case for within-pathway correlations, there are also significant cross-pathway correlations between respective purine and tryptophan (TRP) pathway metabolites. By contrast, purine metabolites show significant cross-pathway correlation only with tyrosine, and not with its metabolites. Furthermore, several purine metabolites (UA, guanosine, or xanthine) are each significantly correlated with 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in healthy controls, but not in FENNS at baseline or 4-week after antipsychotic treatment. Taken together, the above findings suggest that purine catabolism strongly associates with the TRP pathways leading to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and kynurenine metabolites. The lack of a significant correlation between purine metabolites and 5-HIAA, suggests alterations in key 5-HT pathways that may both be modified by and contribute to oxidative stress via purine catabolism in FENNS.
Published Version: doi:10.3389/fncel.2013.00090
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3678099/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11708678
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