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dc.contributor.authorKim, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaada, Adriannaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T18:11:01Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationKim, Daniel, and Adrianna Saada. 2013. “The Social Determinants of Infant Mortality and Birth Outcomes in Western Developed Nations: A Cross-Country Systematic Review.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 10 (6): 2296-2335. doi:10.3390/ijerph10062296. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph10062296.en
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11717538
dc.description.abstractInfant mortality (IM) and birth outcomes, key population health indicators, have lifelong implications for individuals, and are unequally distributed globally. Even among western industrialized nations, striking cross-country and within-country patterns are evident. We sought to better understand these variations across and within the United States of America (USA) and Western Europe (WE), by conceptualizing a social determinants of IM/birth outcomes framework, and systematically reviewing the empirical literature on hypothesized social determinants (e.g., social policies, neighbourhood deprivation, individual socioeconomic status (SES)) and intermediary determinants (e.g., health behaviours). To date, the evidence suggests that income inequality and social policies (e.g., maternal leave policies) may help to explain cross-country variations in IM/birth outcomes. Within countries, the evidence also supports neighbourhood SES (USA, WE) and income inequality (USA) as social determinants. By contrast, within-country social cohesion/social capital has been underexplored. At the individual level, mixed associations have been found between individual SES, race/ethnicity, and selected intermediary factors (e.g., psychosocial factors) with IM/birth outcomes. Meanwhile, this review identifies several methodological gaps, including the underuse of prospective designs and the presence of residual confounding in a number of studies. Ultimately, addressing such gaps including through novel approaches to strengthen causal inference and implementing both health and non-health policies may reduce inequities in IM/birth outcomes across the western developed world.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.3390/ijerph10062296en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3717738/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectsocial determinants of healthen
dc.subjectinfant mortalityen
dc.subjectbirth outcomesen
dc.subjectpreterm birthen
dc.subjectUnited Statesen
dc.subjectWestern Europeen
dc.titleThe Social Determinants of Infant Mortality and Birth Outcomes in Western Developed Nations: A Cross-Country Systematic Reviewen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen
dash.depositing.authorSaada, Adriannaen_US
dc.date.available2014-02-18T18:11:01Z
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph10062296*
dash.contributor.affiliatedSaada, Adrianna


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