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dc.contributor.authorRIGHI, VALERIAen_US
dc.contributor.authorAPIDIANAKIS, YIORGOSen_US
dc.contributor.authorMINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOSen_US
dc.contributor.authorASTRAKAS, LOUKASen_US
dc.contributor.authorRAHME, LAURENCE G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTZIKA, A. ARIAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T18:11:47Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationRIGHI, VALERIA, YIORGOS APIDIANAKIS, DIONYSSIOS MINTZOPOULOS, LOUKAS ASTRAKAS, LAURENCE G. RAHME, and A. ARIA TZIKA. 2010. “In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling.” International Journal of Molecular Medicine 26 (2): 175-184. doi:10.3892/ijmm_00000450. http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ijmm_00000450.en
dc.identifier.issn1107-3756en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11717628
dc.description.abstractIn vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a non-destructive biochemical tool for investigating live organisms, has yet to be used in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a useful model organism for investigating genetics and physiology. We developed and implemented a high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) MRS method to investigate live Drosophila at 14.1 T. We demonstrated, for the first time, the feasibility of using HRMAS MRS for molecular characterization of Drosophila with a conventional MR spectrometer equipped with an HRMAS probe. We showed that the metabolic HRMAS MRS profiles of injured, aged wild-type (wt) flies and of immune deficient (imd) flies were more similar to chico flies mutated at the chico gene in the insulin signaling pathway, which is analogous to insulin receptor substrate 1–4 (IRS1–4) in mammals and less to those of adipokinetic hormone receptor (akhr) mutant flies, which have an obese phenotype. We thus provide evidence for the hypothesis that trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to insulin signaling. This link may explain the mitochondrial dysfunction that accompanies insulin resistance and muscle wasting that occurs in trauma, aging and immune system deficiencies, leading to higher susceptibility to infection. Our approach advances the development of novel in vivo non-destructive research approaches in Drosophila, suggests biomarkers for investigation of biomedical paradigms, and thus may contribute to novel therapeutic development.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherD.A. Spandidosen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.3892/ijmm_00000450en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3722717/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectmagnetic resonance spectroscopyen
dc.subjecthigh resolution magic angle spinningen
dc.subjecttotal through bond correlation spectroscopyen
dc.subjecten
dc.subjectbiomarkersen
dc.subjectimmunityen
dc.subjectinsulin signalingen
dc.subjectobesityen
dc.subjectagingen
dc.titleIn vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signalingen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalInternational Journal of Molecular Medicineen
dash.depositing.authorMINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOSen_US
dc.date.available2014-02-18T18:11:47Z
dc.identifier.doi10.3892/ijmm_00000450*
dash.contributor.affiliatedMintzopoulos, Dionyssios
dash.contributor.affiliatedTzika, A.
dash.contributor.affiliatedRahme, Laurence


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