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dc.contributor.authorWeir, Gordon Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorBonner-Weir, Susanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T18:11:48Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationWeir, Gordon C., and Susan Bonner-Weir. 2013. “Islet β cell mass in diabetes and how it relates to function, birth, and death.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1281 (1): 92-105. doi:10.1111/nyas.12031. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nyas.12031.en
dc.identifier.issn0077-8923en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11717631
dc.description.abstractIn type 1 diabetes (T1D) β cell mass is markedly reduced by autoimmunity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) results from inadequate β cell mass and function that can no longer compensate for insulin resistance. The reduction of β cell mass in T2D may result from increased cell death and/or inadequate birth through replication and neogenesis. Reduction in mass allows glucose levels to rise, which places β cells in an unfamiliar hyperglycemic environment, leading to marked changes in their phenotype and a dramatic loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), which worsens as glucose levels climb. Toxic effects of glucose on β cells (glucotoxicity) appear to be the culprit. This dysfunctional insulin secretion can be reversed when glucose levels are lowered by treatment, a finding with therapeutic significance. Restoration of β cell mass in both types of diabetes could be accomplished by either β cell regeneration or transplantation. Learning more about the relationships between β cell mass, turnover, and function and finding ways to restore β cell mass are among the most urgent priorities for diabetes research.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltden
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1111/nyas.12031en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3618572/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectbeta cellen
dc.subjectisletsen
dc.subjectdiabetesen
dc.subjectneogenesisen
dc.subjectinsulin secretionen
dc.titleIslet β cell mass in diabetes and how it relates to function, birth, and deathen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciencesen
dash.depositing.authorWeir, Gordon Cen_US
dc.date.available2014-02-18T18:11:48Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/nyas.12031*
dash.contributor.affiliatedBonner-Weir, Susan
dash.contributor.affiliatedWeir, Gordon


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