Analysis of 6,515 exomes reveals a recent origin of most human protein-coding variants

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Analysis of 6,515 exomes reveals a recent origin of most human protein-coding variants

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Title: Analysis of 6,515 exomes reveals a recent origin of most human protein-coding variants
Author: Fu, Wenqing; O'Connor, Timothy D.; Jun, Goo; Kang, Hyun Min; Abecasis, Goncalo; Leal, Suzanne M.; Gabriel, Stacey; Altshuler, David; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; GO, Broad; GO, Seattle; Akey, Joshua M.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Fu, W., T. D. O'Connor, G. Jun, H. M. Kang, G. Abecasis, S. M. Leal, S. Gabriel, et al. 2012. “Analysis of 6,515 exomes reveals a recent origin of most human protein-coding variants.” Nature 493 (7431): 216-220. doi:10.1038/nature11690. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11690.
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Abstract: Establishing the age of each mutation segregating in contemporary human populations is important to fully understand our evolutionary history1,2 and will help facilitate the development of new approaches for disease gene discovery3. Large-scale surveys of human genetic variation have reported signatures of recent explosive population growth4-6, notable for an excess of rare genetic variants, qualitatively suggesting that many mutations arose recently. To more quantitatively assess the distribution of mutation ages, we resequenced 15,336 genes in 6,515 individuals of European (n=4,298) and African (n=2,217) American ancestry and inferred the age of 1,146,401 autosomal single nucleotide variants (SNVs). We estimate that ~73% of all protein-coding SNVs and ~86% of SNVs predicted to be deleterious arose in the past 5,000-10,000 years. The average age of deleterious SNVs varied significantly across molecular pathways, and disease genes contained a significantly higher proportion of recently arisen deleterious SNVs compared to other genes. Furthermore, European Americans had an excess of deleterious variants in essential and Mendelian disease genes compared to African Americans, consistent with weaker purifying selection due to the out-of-Africa dispersal. Our results better delimit the historical details of human protein-coding variation, illustrate the profound effect recent human history has had on the burden of deleterious SNVs segregating in contemporary populations, and provides important practical information that can be used to prioritize variants in disease gene discovery.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/nature11690
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3676746/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11717639
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