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dc.contributor.authorBunyavanich, Supindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSilberg, Judy L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLasky-Su, Jessicaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Nathan A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLange, Nancy E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCanino, Glorisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCeledόn, Juan C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T18:12:01Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationBunyavanich, Supinda, Judy L. Silberg, Jessica Lasky-Su, Nathan A. Gillespie, Nancy E. Lange, Glorisa Canino, and Juan C. Celedόn. 2013. “A Twin Study of Early-Childhood Asthma in Puerto Ricans.” PLoS ONE 8 (7): e68473. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0068473. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0068473.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11717667
dc.description.abstractBackground: The relative contributions of genetics and environment to asthma in Hispanics or to asthma in children younger than 3 years are not well understood. Objective: To examine the relative contributions of genetics and environment to early-childhood asthma by performing a longitudinal twin study of asthma in Puerto Rican children ≤3 years old. Methods: 678 twin infants from the Puerto Rico Neo-Natal Twin Registry were assessed for asthma at age 1 year, with follow-up data obtained for 624 twins at age 3 years. Zygosity was determined by DNA microsatellite profiling. Structural equation modeling was performed for three phenotypes at ages 1 and 3 years: physician-diagnosed asthma, asthma medication use in the past year, and ≥1 hospitalization for asthma in the past year. Models were additionally adjusted for early-life environmental tobacco smoke exposure, sex, and age. Results: The prevalences of physician-diagnosed asthma, asthma medication use, and hospitalization for asthma were 11.6%, 10.8%, 4.9% at age 1 year, and 34.1%, 40.1%, and 8.5% at 3 years, respectively. Shared environmental effects contributed to the majority of variance in susceptibility to physician-diagnosed asthma and asthma medication use in the first year of life (84%–86%), while genetic effects drove variance in all phenotypes (45%–65%) at age 3 years. Early-life environmental tobacco smoke, sex, and age contributed to variance in susceptibility. Conclusion: Our longitudinal study in Puerto Rican twins demonstrates a changing contribution of shared environmental effects to liability for physician-diagnosed asthma and asthma medication use between ages 1 and 3 years. Early-life environmental tobacco smoke reduction could markedly reduce asthma morbidity in young Puerto Rican children.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0068473en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3700929/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectGenetic Epidemiologyen
dc.subjectPediatricsen
dc.subjectPediatric Pulmonologyen
dc.subjectPublic Healthen
dc.subjectBehavioral and Social Aspects of Healthen
dc.subjectChild Healthen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Healthen
dc.subjectPreventive Medicineen
dc.subjectPulmonologyen
dc.subjectAsthmaen
dc.subjectSmoking Related Disordersen
dc.titleA Twin Study of Early-Childhood Asthma in Puerto Ricansen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorLasky-Su, Jessicaen_US
dc.date.available2014-02-18T18:12:01Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0068473*
dash.contributor.affiliatedLange, Nancy E
dash.contributor.affiliatedSu, Jessica


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