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dc.contributor.authorNye, Joseph S.
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-24T18:49:43Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationNye, J. S. 2014. “Transformational and Transactional Presidents.” Leadership 10 (1) (February 1): 118–124. doi:10.1177/1742715013512049. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1742715013512049.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1742-7150en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11738399
dc.description.abstractDuring the 20th century, the United States went from being a second rate power to becoming the world’s sole superpower. Did leaders matter? In the cases I examined in Presidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era, most presidents mattered, but not necessarily those that one might expect. Leadership experts distinguish transformational leaders with broad visions and an inspirational style (such as Woodrow Wilson or Ronald Reagan) from transactional leaders who have modest vision and a managerial style (such as Dwight Eisenhower or George H.W. Bush). Experts and editorialists generally prefer transformational leaders and consider them both more effective and more ethical. But the concepts have been poorly defined, and the normative preference for transformational leaders is not justified. Leadership theorists need to be more careful in their definitions and assessments.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSAGE PUBLICATIONSen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1177/1742715013512049en_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.subjectLeadershipen_US
dc.titleTransformational and Transactional Presidentsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalLeadershipen_US
dash.depositing.authorNye, Joseph S.
dash.embargo.until10000-01-01
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1742715013512049*
dash.contributor.affiliatedNye, Joseph


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