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dc.contributor.advisorElliott, Mark C.
dc.contributor.authorOidtmann, Max Gordon
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-25T21:42:58Z
dash.embargo.terms2016-02-04en_US
dash.embargo.terms2016-02-04
dc.date.issued2014-02-25
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationOidtmann, Max Gordon. 2014. Between Patron and Priest: Amdo Tibet Under Qing Rule, 1792-1911. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University.en_US
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/gsas.harvard:11276en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11745702
dc.description.abstractIn the late eighteenth century, a Qing-centered, pluralistic legal order emerged in the Tibetan regions of the Qing empire. In the Gansu borderlands known to Tibetans as "Amdo," the Qing state established subprefectures to administer indigenous populations and prepare them for integration into the empire. In the 1790s, the Qianlong emperor asserted the dynasty's sovereignty in central Tibet and embarked on a program to reform the Tibetan government. This dissertation examines the nineteenth-century legacy of these policies from the twin perspectives of the indigenous people of the region and the officials dispatched to manage them. On the basis of Manchu and Tibetan-language sources, Part One argues that the exercise of Qing sovereignty in central Tibet was connected to the Qianlong court's desire to monopolize indigenous arts of divination, especially as they related to the identification of prominent reincarnations. The Qing court exported a Ming-era bureaucratic technology--a lottery, and repurposed it as a divination technology--the Golden Urn. The successful implementation of this new ritual, however, hinged on the astute use of legal cases and the intervention of Tibetan Buddhist elites, who found a home for the Urn within indigenous traditions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEast Asian Languages and Civilizationsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectAsian historyen_US
dc.subjectAmdoen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectLegal Pluralismen_US
dc.subjectQing Empireen_US
dc.subjectTibeten_US
dc.subjectTibetan Buddhismen_US
dc.titleBetween Patron and Priest: Amdo Tibet Under Qing Rule, 1792-1911en_US
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen_US
dash.depositing.authorOidtmann, Max Gordon
dc.date.available2016-02-04T08:30:52Z
thesis.degree.date2014en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian Languages and Civilizationsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Universityen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSzonyi, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMembervan der Kuijp, Leonarden_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLipman, Jonathanen_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedOidtmann, Max Gordon


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