Genetic Surveillance Detects Both Clonal and Epidemic Transmission of Malaria following Enhanced Intervention in Senegal

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Genetic Surveillance Detects Both Clonal and Epidemic Transmission of Malaria following Enhanced Intervention in Senegal

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Title: Genetic Surveillance Detects Both Clonal and Epidemic Transmission of Malaria following Enhanced Intervention in Senegal
Author: Daniels, Rachel Fath; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Séne, Papa Diogoye; Park, Danny C.; Neafsey, Daniel Edward; Schaffner, Stephen; Hamilton, Elizabeth Julia; Lukens, Amanda Kathleen; Van Tyne, Daria Natalie; Mboup, Souleymane; Sabeti, Pardis Christine; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann Fergus; Hartl, Daniel L.; Cooke, Sarah Volkman

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Daniels, Rachel Fath, Hsiao-Han Chang, Papa Diogoye Séne, Danny C. Park, Daniel Edward Neafsey, Stephen Schaffner, Elizabeth Julia Hamilton, et al. 2013. Genetic surveillance detects both clonal and epidemic transmission of malaria following enhanced intervention in Senegal. PLoS ONE 8(4): e60780.
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Abstract: Using parasite genotyping tools, we screened patients with mild uncomplicated malaria seeking treatment at a clinic in Thiès, Senegal, from 2006 to 2011. We identified a growing frequency of infections caused by genetically identical parasite strains, coincident with increased deployment of malaria control interventions and decreased malaria deaths. Parasite genotypes in some cases persisted clonally across dry seasons. The increase in frequency of genetically identical parasite strains corresponded with decrease in the probability of multiple infections. Further, these observations support evidence of both clonal and epidemic population structures. These data provide the first evidence of a temporal correlation between the appearance of identical parasite types and increased malaria control efforts in Africa, which here included distribution of insecticide treated nets (ITNs), use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria detection, and deployment of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT). Our results imply that genetic surveillance can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of disease control strategies and assist a rational global malaria eradication campaign.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0060780
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3617153/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11807558
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