Interspecies Interactions Stimulate Diversification of the Streptomyces coelicolor Secreted Metabolome

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Interspecies Interactions Stimulate Diversification of the Streptomyces coelicolor Secreted Metabolome

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Title: Interspecies Interactions Stimulate Diversification of the Streptomyces coelicolor Secreted Metabolome
Author: Traxler, Matthew F.; Watrous, Jeramie D.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Kolter, Roberto

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Citation: Traxler, Matthew F., Jeramie D. Watrous, Theodore Alexandrov, Pieter C. Dorrestein, and Roberto Kolter. 2013. “Interspecies Interactions Stimulate Diversification of the Streptomyces coelicolor Secreted Metabolome.” mBio 4 (4): e00459-13. doi:10.1128/mBio.00459-13. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00459-13.
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Abstract: ABSTRACT Soils host diverse microbial communities that include filamentous actinobacteria (actinomycetes). These bacteria have been a rich source of useful metabolites, including antimicrobials, antifungals, anticancer agents, siderophores, and immunosuppressants. While humans have long exploited these compounds for therapeutic purposes, the role these natural products may play in mediating interactions between actinomycetes has been difficult to ascertain. As an initial step toward understanding these chemical interactions at a systems level, we employed the emerging techniques of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (NanoDESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry to gain a global chemical view of the model bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor interacting with five other actinomycetes. In each interaction, the majority of secreted compounds associated with S. coelicolor colonies were unique, suggesting an idiosyncratic response from S. coelicolor. Spectral networking revealed a family of unknown compounds produced by S. coelicolor during several interactions. These compounds constitute an extended suite of at least 12 different desferrioxamines with acyl side chains of various lengths; their production was triggered by siderophores made by neighboring strains. Taken together, these results illustrate that chemical interactions between actinomycete bacteria exhibit high complexity and specificity and can drive differential secondary metabolite production.
Published Version: doi:10.1128/mBio.00459-13
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3747584/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11855710
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