Shifts in the Distribution of Mass Densities Is a Signature of Caloric Restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans

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Shifts in the Distribution of Mass Densities Is a Signature of Caloric Restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans

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Title: Shifts in the Distribution of Mass Densities Is a Signature of Caloric Restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans
Author: Reina, Alfonso; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Laromaine, Anna; Samuel, Aravinthan D. T.; Whitesides, George M.

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Citation: Reina, Alfonso, Anand Bala Subramaniam, Anna Laromaine, Aravinthan D. T. Samuel, and George M. Whitesides. 2013. “Shifts in the Distribution of Mass Densities Is a Signature of Caloric Restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans.” PLoS ONE 8 (7): e69651. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0069651. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069651.
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Abstract: Although the starvation response of the model multicellular organism Caenorhabditis elegans is a subject of much research, there is no convenient phenotypic readout of caloric restriction that can be applicable to large numbers of worms. This paper describes the distribution of mass densities of populations of C. elegans, from larval stages up to day one of adulthood, using isopycnic centrifugation, and finds that density is a convenient, if complex, phenotypic readout in C. elegans. The density of worms in synchronized populations of wildtype N2 C. elegans grown under standard solid-phase culture conditions was normally distributed, with distributions peaked sharply at a mean of 1.091 g/cm3 for L1, L2 and L3 larvae, 1.087 g/cm3 for L4 larvae, 1.081 g/cm3 for newly molted adults, and 1.074 g/cm3 at 24 hours of adulthood. The density of adult worms under starvation stress fell well outside this range, falling to a mean value of 1.054 g/cm3 after eight hours of starvation. This decrease in density correlated with the consumption of stored glycogen in the food-deprived worms. The density of the worms increased when deprived of food for longer durations, corresponding to a shift in the response of the worms: worms sacrifice their bodies by retaining larvae, which consume the adults from within. Density-based screens with the drug Ivermectin on worms cultured on single plates resulted in a clear bimodal (double-peaked) distribution of densities corresponding to drug exposed and non-exposed worms. Thus, measurements of changes in density could be used to conduct screens on the effects of drugs on several populations of worms cultured on single plates.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0069651
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3726776/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11855781
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