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dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Judith Pizarroen_US
dc.contributor.authorSilver, Roxane Cohenen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Brandonen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoperwas, Billieen_US
dc.contributor.authorKirschbaum, Clemensen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-10T20:33:33Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationAndersen, Judith Pizarro, Roxane Cohen Silver, Brandon Stewart, Billie Koperwas, and Clemens Kirschbaum. 2013. “Psychological and Physiological Responses following Repeated Peer Death.” PLoS ONE 8 (9): e75881. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0075881. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075881.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11878864
dc.description.abstractObjective: Undergraduates at a university in the United States were exposed – directly and indirectly – to 14 peer deaths during one academic year. We examined how individual and social factors were associated with psychological (e.g., anxiety, depression, somatization) and physiological (i.e., cortisol) distress responses following this unexpected and repeated experience with loss. Method Two to three months after the final peer death, respondents (N = 122, 61% female, 18–23 years, M = 20.13, SD = 1.14) reported prior adverse experiences, degree of closeness with the deceased, acute responses to the peer deaths, ongoing distress responses, social support, support seeking, and media viewing. A subset (n = 24) returned hair samples for evaluation of cortisol responses during the previous 3 months. Results: Ongoing psychological distress was associated with a) prior interpersonal trauma, b) fewer social supports, and c) media exposure to news of the deaths (p's<.05). Participants who had no prior bereavements showed, on average, high cortisol (>25 p/mg) compared to individuals with one or two prior bereavement experiences (who were, on average, within the normal range, 10 to 25 p/mg) (p<.05). Only 8% of the sample utilized available university psychological or physical health resources and support groups. Conclusions: Limited research has examined the psychological and physiological impact of exposure to chronic, repeated peer loss, despite the fact that there are groups of individuals (e.g., police, military soldiers) that routinely face such exposures. Prior adversity appears to play a role in shaping psychological and physiological responses to repeated loss. This topic warrants further research given the health implications of repeated loss for individuals in high-risk occupations and university settings.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0075881en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3785440/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.titlePsychological and Physiological Responses following Repeated Peer Deathen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorStewart, Brandonen_US
dc.date.available2014-03-10T20:33:33Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0075881*
dash.contributor.affiliatedStewart, Brandon Michael


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