Landscape of the PARKIN-dependent ubiquitylome in response to mitochondrial depolarization

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Landscape of the PARKIN-dependent ubiquitylome in response to mitochondrial depolarization

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Title: Landscape of the PARKIN-dependent ubiquitylome in response to mitochondrial depolarization
Author: Sarraf, Shireen A.; Raman, Malavika; Guarani-Pereira, Virginia; Sowa, Mathew E.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Harper, J. Wade

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Citation: Sarraf, Shireen A., Malavika Raman, Virginia Guarani-Pereira, Mathew E. Sowa, Edward L. Huttlin, Steven P. Gygi, and J. Wade Harper. 2013. “Landscape of the PARKIN-dependent ubiquitylome in response to mitochondrial depolarization.” Nature 496 (7445): 372-376. doi:10.1038/nature12043. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12043.
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Abstract: The PARKIN (PARK2) ubiquitin ligase and its regulatory kinase PINK1 (PARK6), often mutated in familial early onset Parkinson’s Disease (PD), play central roles in mitochondrial homeostasis and mitophagy.1–3 While PARKIN is recruited to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) upon depolarization via PINK1 action and can ubiquitylate Porin, Mitofusin, and Miro proteins on the MOM,1,4–11 the full repertoire of PARKIN substrates – the PARKIN-dependent ubiquitylome - remains poorly defined. Here we employ quantitative diGLY capture proteomics12,13 to elucidate the ubiquitylation site-specificity and topology of PARKIN-dependent target modification in response to mitochondrial depolarization. Hundreds of dynamically regulated ubiquitylation sites in dozens of proteins were identified, with strong enrichment for MOM proteins, indicating that PARKIN dramatically alters the ubiquitylation status of the mitochondrial proteome. Using complementary interaction proteomics, we found depolarization-dependent PARKIN association with numerous MOM targets, autophagy receptors, and the proteasome. Mutation of PARKIN’s active site residue C431, which has been found mutated in PD patients, largely disrupts these associations. Structural and topological analysis revealed extensive conservation of PARKIN-dependent ubiquitylation sites on cytoplasmic domains in vertebrate and D. melanogaster MOM proteins. These studies provide a resource for understanding how the PINK1-PARKIN pathway re-sculpts the proteome to support mitochondrial homeostasis.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/nature12043
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3641819/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11878916
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