Segmental chromosomal alterations have prognostic impact in neuroblastoma: a report from the INRG project

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Segmental chromosomal alterations have prognostic impact in neuroblastoma: a report from the INRG project

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Title: Segmental chromosomal alterations have prognostic impact in neuroblastoma: a report from the INRG project
Author: Schleiermacher, G; Mosseri, V; London, W B; Maris, J M; Brodeur, G M; Attiyeh, E; Haber, M; Khan, J; Nakagawara, A; Speleman, F; Noguera, R; Tonini, G P; Fischer, M; Ambros, I; Monclair, T; Matthay, K K; Ambros, P; Cohn, S L; Pearson, A D J

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Citation: Schleiermacher, G., V. Mosseri, W. B. London, J. M. Maris, G. M. Brodeur, E. Attiyeh, M. Haber, et al. 2012. “Segmental chromosomal alterations have prognostic impact in neuroblastoma: a report from the INRG project.” British Journal of Cancer 107 (8): 1418-1422. doi:10.1038/bjc.2012.375. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2012.375.
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Abstract: Background: In the INRG dataset, the hypothesis that any segmental chromosomal alteration might be of prognostic impact in neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification (MNA) was tested. Methods: The presence of any segmental chromosomal alteration (chromosome 1p deletion, 11q deletion and/or chromosome 17q gain) defined a segmental genomic profile. Only tumours with a confirmed unaltered status for all three chromosome arms were considered as having no segmental chromosomal alterations. Results: Among the 8800 patients in the INRG database, a genomic type could be attributed for 505 patients without MNA: 397 cases had a segmental genomic type, whereas 108 cases had an absence of any segmental alteration. A segmental genomic type was more frequent in patients >18 months and in stage 4 disease (P<0.0001). In univariate analysis, 11q deletion, 17q gain and a segmental genomic type were associated with a poorer event-free survival (EFS) (P<0.0001, P=0.0002 and P<0.0001, respectively). In multivariate analysis modelling EFS, the parameters age, stage and a segmental genomic type were retained in the model, whereas the individual genetic markers were not (P<0.0001 and RR=2.56; P=0.0002 and RR=1.8; P=0.01 and RR=1.7, respectively). Conclusion: A segmental genomic profile, rather than the single genetic markers, adds prognostic information to the clinical markers age and stage in neuroblastoma patients without MNA, underlining the importance of pangenomic studies.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/bjc.2012.375
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3494425/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11878924
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