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dc.contributor.authorLai, Pui Man Rosalinden_US
dc.contributor.authorDasenbrock, Hormuzdiyaren_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Ningen_US
dc.contributor.authorDu, Roseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-11T02:49:42Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationLai, Pui Man Rosalind, Hormuzdiyar Dasenbrock, Ning Lin, and Rose Du. 2013. “The Impact of Insurance Status on the Outcomes after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.” PLoS ONE 8 (10): e78047. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078047. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0078047.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11879163
dc.description.abstractInvestigation into the association of insurance status with the outcomes of patients undergoing neurosurgical intervention has been limited: this is the first nationwide study to analyze the impact of primary payer on the outcomes of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage who underwent endovascular coiling or microsurgical clipping. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2001–2010) was utilized to identify patients; those with both an ICD-9 diagnosis codes for subarachnoid hemorrhage and a procedure code for aneurysm repair (either via an endovascular or surgical approach) were included. Hierarchical multivariate regression analyses were utilized to evaluate the impact of primary payer on in-hospital mortality, hospital discharge disposition, and length of hospital stay with hospital as the random effects variable. Models were adjusted for patient age, sex, race, comorbidities, socioeconomic status, hospital region, location (urban versus rural), and teaching status, procedural volume, year of admission, and the proportion of patients who underwent ventriculostomy. Subsequent models were also adjusted for time to aneurysm repair and time to ventriculostomy; subgroup analyses evaluated for those who underwent endovascular and surgical procedures separately. 15,557 hospitalizations were included. In the initial model, the adjusted odds of in-hospital mortality were higher for Medicare (OR 1.23, p<0.001), Medicaid (OR 1.23, p<0.001), and uninsured patients (OR 1.49, p<0.001) compared to those with private insurance. After also adjusting for timing of intervention, Medicaid and uninsured patients had a reduced odds of non-routine discharge (OR 0.75, p<0.001 and OR 0.42, p<0.001) despite longer hospital stays (by 8.35 days, p<0.001 and 2.45 days, p = 0.005). Variations in outcomes by primary payer–including in-hospital post-procedural mortality–were more pronounced for patients of all insurance types who underwent microsurgical clipping. The observed differences by primary payer are likely multifactorial, attributable to varied socioeconomic factors and the complexities of the American healthcare delivery system.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078047en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3812119/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Insurance Status on the Outcomes after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhageen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorDasenbrock, Hormuzdiyaren_US
dc.date.available2014-03-11T02:49:42Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0078047*
dash.contributor.affiliatedLin, Ning
dash.contributor.affiliatedDasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar
dash.contributor.affiliatedDu, Rose


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