Duplications in RB1CC1 are associated with schizophrenia; identification in large European sample sets

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Duplications in RB1CC1 are associated with schizophrenia; identification in large European sample sets

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Title: Duplications in RB1CC1 are associated with schizophrenia; identification in large European sample sets
Author: Degenhardt, F; Priebe, L; Meier, S; Lennertz, L; Streit, F; Witt, S H; Hofmann, A; Becker, T; Mössner, R; Maier, W; Nenadic, I; Sauer, H; Mattheisen, M; Buizer-Voskamp, J; Ophoff, R A; Rujescu, D; Giegling, I; Ingason, A; Wagner, M; Delobel, B; Andrieux, J; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Heinz, A; Walter, H; Moebus, S; Corvin, A; Kahn, René S; Linszen, Don H; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Rietschel, M; Nöthen, M M; Cichon, S

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Citation: Degenhardt, F., L. Priebe, S. Meier, L. Lennertz, F. Streit, S. H. Witt, A. Hofmann, et al. 2013. “Duplications in RB1CC1 are associated with schizophrenia; identification in large European sample sets.” Translational Psychiatry 3 (11): e326. doi:10.1038/tp.2013.101. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/tp.2013.101.
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Abstract: Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe and debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder with an estimated heritability of ~80%. Recently, de novo mutations, identified by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, have been suggested to contribute to the risk of developing SCZ. Although these studies show an overall excess of de novo mutations among patients compared with controls, it is not easy to pinpoint specific genes hit by de novo mutations as actually involved in the disease process. Importantly, support for a specific gene can be provided by the identification of additional alterations in several independent patients. We took advantage of existing genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data sets to screen for deletions or duplications (copy number variations, CNVs) in genes previously implicated by NGS studies. Our approach was based on the observation that CNVs constitute part of the mutational spectrum in many human disease-associated genes. In a discovery step, we investigated whether CNVs in 55 candidate genes, suggested from NGS studies, were more frequent among 1637 patients compared with 1627 controls. Duplications in RB1CC1 were overrepresented among patients. This finding was followed-up in large, independent European sample sets. In the combined analysis, totaling 8461 patients and 112 871 controls, duplications in RB1CC1 were found to be associated with SCZ (P=1.29 × 10−5; odds ratio=8.58). Our study provides evidence for rare duplications in RB1CC1 as a risk factor for SCZ.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/tp.2013.101
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3849960/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11879302
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