Lanreotide extended-release aqueous-gel formulation, injected by patient, partner or healthcare provider in patients with acromegaly in the United States: 1-year data from the SODA registry

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Lanreotide extended-release aqueous-gel formulation, injected by patient, partner or healthcare provider in patients with acromegaly in the United States: 1-year data from the SODA registry

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Title: Lanreotide extended-release aqueous-gel formulation, injected by patient, partner or healthcare provider in patients with acromegaly in the United States: 1-year data from the SODA registry
Author: Salvatori, Roberto; Woodmansee, Whitney W.; Molitch, Mark; Gordon, Murray B.; Lomax, Kathleen G.

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Citation: Salvatori, Roberto, Whitney W. Woodmansee, Mark Molitch, Murray B. Gordon, and Kathleen G. Lomax. 2013. “Lanreotide extended-release aqueous-gel formulation, injected by patient, partner or healthcare provider in patients with acromegaly in the United States: 1-year data from the SODA registry.” Pituitary 17 (1): 13-21. doi:10.1007/s11102-012-0460-2. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11102-012-0460-2.
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Abstract: Lanreotide depot (LD; commercial name Somatuline® Depot) is an injectable, extended-release formulation of the synthetic somatostatin analog (SSA) lanreotide. In recent clinical trials, LD was found to be suitable for self or partner administration, avoiding the need to travel to a medical facility. The Somatuline® Depot for Acromegaly (SODA) study is an ongoing, multicenter, observational study in the US investigating the efficacy, safety, convenience and symptom relief provided by LD in patients with acromegaly. Sub-analyses explore outcomes according to who administered the injection: patient, partner, healthcare provider (HCP) or a combination. Data reported here reflect one year of patient experience. Patients are eligible for inclusion if they have a diagnosis of acromegaly, are treated with LD and can give signed informed consent. Baseline data include patient demographics, previous acromegaly treatment and investigations, GH and IGF-I levels, LD dose and dose adjustment frequency. Symptom frequency, injection pain and treatment convenience are assessed using patient-reported questionnaires. As of 18 April 2012, 166 patients had enrolled in SODA. Most (72 %) achieved normal IGF-I levels after 12 months of LD treatment. Disease control was similar in self or partner injectors and in patients who received injections from their HCP, although self or partner injecting was deemed more convenient. LD was well-tolerated irrespective of who performed the injection. Self injection led to more injection-site reactions, but this did not increase the rate of treatment interruption. Acromegaly symptoms remained stable. Biochemical, safety and convenience data support the clinical validity of injecting LD at home.
Published Version: doi:10.1007/s11102-012-0460-2
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3895214/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11879615
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