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dc.contributor.authorBotero, Juan
dc.contributor.authorPonce, Alejandro
dc.contributor.authorShleifer, Andrei
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-12T14:11:30Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationBotero, Juan, Alejandro Ponce, and Andrei Shleifer. 2013. “Education, Complaints, and Accountability.” Journal of Law and Economics 56 (4) (November): 959–996. doi:10.1086/674133. http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/674133.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-2186en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:11880346
dc.description.abstractBetter-educated countries have better governments, an empirical regularity that holds in both dictatorships and democracies. Possible reasons for this fact are that educated people are more likely to complain about misconduct by government officials and that more frequent complaints encourage better behavior from officials. Newly assembled individual-level survey data from the World Justice Project show that, within countries, better-educated people are more likely to report official misconduct. The results are confirmed using other survey data on reporting crime and corruption. Citizens’ complaints might thus be an operative mechanism that explains the link between education and the quality of government.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEconomicsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Pressen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1086/674133en_US
dash.licenseOAP
dc.titleEducation, Complaints, and Accountabilityen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2014-02-03T17:19:47Z
dc.description.versionAuthor's Originalen_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Law and Economicsen_US
dash.depositing.authorShleifer, Andrei
dc.date.available2014-03-12T14:11:30Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/674133*
dash.contributor.affiliatedShleifer, Andrei


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