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dc.contributor.authorMcHardy, Ian Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoudarzi, Maryamen_US
dc.contributor.authorTong, Maomengen_US
dc.contributor.authorRuegger, Paul Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwager, Emmaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeger, John Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorGraeber, Thomas Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSonnenburg, Justin Len_US
dc.contributor.authorHorvath, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuttenhower, Curtisen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGovern, Dermot PBen_US
dc.contributor.authorFornace, Albert Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorBorneman, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorBraun, Jonathanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-06T16:15:56Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationMcHardy, I. H., M. Goudarzi, M. Tong, P. M. Ruegger, E. Schwager, J. R. Weger, T. G. Graeber, et al. 2013. “Integrative analysis of the microbiome and metabolome of the human intestinal mucosal surface reveals exquisite inter-relationships.” Microbiome 1 (1): 17. doi:10.1186/2049-2618-1-17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2049-2618-1-17.en
dc.identifier.issn2049-2618en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12152834
dc.description.abstractBackground: Consistent compositional shifts in the gut microbiota are observed in IBD and other chronic intestinal disorders and may contribute to pathogenesis. The identities of microbial biomolecular mechanisms and metabolic products responsible for disease phenotypes remain to be determined, as do the means by which such microbial functions may be therapeutically modified. Results: The composition of the microbiota and metabolites in gut microbiome samples in 47 subjects were determined. Samples were obtained by endoscopic mucosal lavage from the cecum and sigmoid colon regions, and each sample was sequenced using the 16S rRNA gene V4 region (Illumina-HiSeq 2000 platform) and assessed by UPLC mass spectroscopy. Spearman correlations were used to identify widespread, statistically significant microbial-metabolite relationships. Metagenomes for identified microbial OTUs were imputed using PICRUSt, and KEGG metabolic pathway modules for imputed genes were assigned using HUMAnN. The resulting metabolic pathway abundances were mostly concordant with metabolite data. Analysis of the metabolome-driven distribution of OTU phylogeny and function revealed clusters of clades that were both metabolically and metagenomically similar. Conclusions: The results suggest that microbes are syntropic with mucosal metabolome composition and therefore may be the source of and/or dependent upon gut epithelial metabolites. The consistent relationship between inferred metagenomic function and assayed metabolites suggests that metagenomic composition is predictive to a reasonable degree of microbial community metabolite pools. The finding that certain metabolites strongly correlate with microbial community structure raises the possibility of targeting metabolites for monitoring and/or therapeutically manipulating microbial community function in IBD and other chronic diseases.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1186/2049-2618-1-17en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3971612/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiomeen
dc.subjectMetabolomeen
dc.subjectInter-omic analysisen
dc.titleIntegrative analysis of the microbiome and metabolome of the human intestinal mucosal surface reveals exquisite inter-relationshipsen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalMicrobiomeen
dash.depositing.authorSchwager, Emmaen_US
dc.date.available2014-05-06T16:15:56Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/2049-2618-1-17*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedSchwager, Emma Holdrich


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