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dc.contributor.authorNon, Amy L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRimm, Eric B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKawachi, Ichiroen_US
dc.contributor.authorRewak, Marissa A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKubzansky, Laura D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-06T16:16:07Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationNon, Amy L., Eric B. Rimm, Ichiro Kawachi, Marissa A. Rewak, and Laura D. Kubzansky. 2014. “The Effects of Stress at Work and at Home on Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction.” PLoS ONE 9 (4): e94474. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0094474. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094474.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12152838
dc.description.abstractThis study examined whether stress at work and at home may be related to dysregulation of inflammation and endothelial function, two important contributors to the development of cardiovascular disease. In order to explore potential biological mechanisms linking stress with cardiovascular health, we investigated cross-sectional associations between stress at work and at home with an inflammation score (n's range from 406–433) and with two endothelial biomarkers (intercellular and vascular adhesion molecules, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1; n's range from 205–235) in a cohort of healthy US male health professionals. No associations were found between stress at work or at home and inflammation. Men with high or medium levels of stress at work had significantly higher levels of sVCAM-1 (13% increase) and marginally higher levels of sICAM-1 (9% increase), relative to those reporting low stress at work, independent of health behaviors. Men with high levels of stress at home had marginally higher levels of both sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 than those with low stress at home. While lack of findings related to inflammation are somewhat surprising, if replicated in future studies, these findings may suggest that endothelial dysfunction is an important biological mechanism linking stress at work with cardiovascular health outcomes in men.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0094474en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3983187/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectBiology and Life Sciencesen
dc.subjectAnatomyen
dc.subjectBiological Tissueen
dc.subjectEpitheliumen
dc.subjectEpithelial Cellsen
dc.subjectEndothelial Cellsen
dc.subjectCardiovascular Anatomyen
dc.subjectBiochemistryen
dc.subjectBiomarkersen
dc.subjectCell Biologyen
dc.subjectCellular Typesen
dc.subjectMolecular Cell Biologyen
dc.subjectImmunologyen
dc.subjectImmune Responseen
dc.subjectInflammationen
dc.subjectImmunityen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectPsychological Stressen
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectDiagnostic Medicineen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectPsychological and Psychosocial Issuesen
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectBiomarker Epidemiologyen
dc.subjectCardiovascular Disease Epidemiologyen
dc.subjectMental Health and Psychiatryen
dc.subjectPathology and Laboratory Medicineen
dc.subjectPublic and Occupational Healthen
dc.subjectOccupational and Industrial Medicineen
dc.subjectClinical Research Designen
dc.subjectCohort Studiesen
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen
dc.titleThe Effects of Stress at Work and at Home on Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunctionen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorRimm, Eric B.en_US
dc.date.available2014-05-06T16:16:07Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0094474*
dash.contributor.affiliatedKubzansky, Laura
dash.contributor.affiliatedRimm, Eric
dash.contributor.affiliatedKawachi, Ichiro


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