Characterization of Mammalian Selenoprotein O: A Redox-Active Mitochondrial Protein

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Characterization of Mammalian Selenoprotein O: A Redox-Active Mitochondrial Protein

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Title: Characterization of Mammalian Selenoprotein O: A Redox-Active Mitochondrial Protein
Author: Han, Seong-Jeong; Lee, Byung Cheon; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Lee, Seung-Rock

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Citation: Han, Seong-Jeong, Byung Cheon Lee, Sun Hee Yim, Vadim N. Gladyshev, and Seung-Rock Lee. 2014. “Characterization of Mammalian Selenoprotein O: A Redox-Active Mitochondrial Protein.” PLoS ONE 9 (4): e95518. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0095518. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0095518.
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Abstract: Selenoproteins exhibit diverse biological functions, most of which are associated with redox control. However, the functions of approximately half of mammalian selenoproteins are not known. One such protein is Selenoprotein O (SelO), the largest mammalian selenoprotein with orthologs found in a wide range of organisms, including bacteria and yeast. Here, we report characterization of mammalian SelO. Expression of this protein could be verified in HEK 293T cells by metabolic labeling of cells with 75Se, and it was abolished when selenocysteine was replaced with serine. A CxxU motif was identified in the C-terminal region of SelO. This protein was reversibly oxidized in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in HEK 293T cells when cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide. This treatment led to the formation of a transient 88 kDa SelO-containing complex. The formation of this complex was enhanced by replacing the CxxU motif with SxxC, but abolished when it was replaced with SxxS, suggesting a redox interaction of SelO with another protein through its Sec residue. SelO was localized to mitochondria and expressed across mouse tissues. Its expression was little affected by selenium deficiency, suggesting it has a high priority for selenium supply. Taken together, these results show that SelO is a redox-active mitochondrial selenoprotein.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0095518
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3994087/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12152977
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