Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBurton, Briana
dc.contributor.authorBesprozvannaya, Marina
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-06T21:29:55Z
dash.embargo.terms2016-06-04en_US
dc.date.issued2014-06-06
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.citationBesprozvannaya, Marina. 2014. From DNA sequence recognition to directional chromosome segregation: Information transfer in the translocase protein SpoIIIE. Doctoral dissertation, Harvard University.en_US
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dissertations.umi.com/gsas.harvard:11373en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274593
dc.description.abstractFaithful chromosome segregation is essential for all living organisms. Bacterial chromosome segregation utilizes highly conserved directional SpoIIIE/FtsK translocases to move large DNA molecules between spatially separated compartments. These translocases employ an accessory DNA-interacting domain (gamma) that dictates the direction of DNA transport by recognizing specific DNA sequences. To date it remains unclear how these translocases use DNA sequence information as a trigger to expend chemical energy (ATP turnover) and thereby power mechanical work (DNA movement). In this thesis, I undertook a mechanistic study of directional DNA movement by SpoIIIE from the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Specifically, I was interested in understanding the information transfer within the protein from sequence recognition, to ATP turnover, and ultimately to chromosome translocation. How do DNA sequences trigger directional chromosome movement?en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dash.licenseMETA_ONLY
dc.subjectBiochemistryen_US
dc.subjectMolecular biologyen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen_US
dc.subjectATPase molecular motorsen_US
dc.subjectBacillus subtilisen_US
dc.subjectchromosome segregationen_US
dc.subjectdirectional DNA translocationen_US
dc.subjectSpoIIIE/FtsKen_US
dc.subjectsporulationen_US
dc.titleFrom DNA sequence recognition to directional chromosome segregation: Information transfer in the translocase protein SpoIIIEen_US
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen_US
dash.depositing.authorBesprozvannaya, Marina
dash.embargo.until10000-01-01
thesis.degree.date2014en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiology, Molecular and Cellularen_US
thesis.degree.grantorHarvard Universityen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSchier, Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLosick, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLeschziner, Andresen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberReck-Peterson, Samaraen_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedBesprozvannaya, Marina


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record