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dc.contributor.authorHan, Zaizhu
dc.contributor.authorBi, Yanchao
dc.contributor.authorChen, Jing
dc.contributor.authorChen, Quanjing
dc.contributor.authorHe, Yong
dc.contributor.authorCaramazza, Alfonso
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-26T14:36:04Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationHan, Zaizhu, Yanchao Bi, Jing Chen, Quanjing Chen, Yong He, and Alfonso Caramazza. 2013. “Distinct Regions of Right Temporal Cortex Are Associated with Biological and Human-Agent Motion: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neuropsychological Evidence.” Journal of Neuroscience 33, no. 39: 15442–15453.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0270-6474en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12363925
dc.description.abstractIn human lateral temporal cortex, some regions show specific sensitivity to human motion. Here we examine whether such effects reflect a general biological-nonbiological organizational principle or a process specific to human-agent processing by comparing processing of human, animal, and tool motion in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with healthy participants and a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) study of patients with brain damage (77 stroke patients). The fMRI experiment revealed that in the lateral temporal cortex, the posterior superior temporal sulcus shows a preference for human and animal motion, whereas the middle part of the right superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (mSTS/STG) shows a preference for human and functional tool motion. VLSM analyses also revealed that damage to this right mSTS/STG region led to more severe impairment in the recognition of human and functional tool motion relative to animal motion, indicating the causal role of this brain area in human-agent motion processing. The findings for the right mSTS/STG cannot be reduced to a preference for articulated motion or processing of social variables since neither factor is involved in functional tool motion recognition. We conclude that a unidimensional biological-nonbiological distinction cannot fully explain the visual motion effects in lateral temporal cortex. Instead, the results suggest the existence of distinct components in right posterior temporal cortex and mSTS/STG that are associated, respectively, with biological motion and human-agent motion processing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPsychologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscienceen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5868-12.2013en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleDistinct Regions of Right Temporal Cortex Are Associated with Biological and Human-Agent Motion: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neuropsychological Evidenceen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Neuroscienceen_US
dash.depositing.authorCaramazza, Alfonso
dc.date.available2014-06-26T14:36:04Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5868-12.2013*
workflow.legacycommentsFAR 2014en_US
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedCaramazza, Alfonso


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