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dc.contributor.authorFitzmaurice, Garretten_US
dc.contributor.authorLipsitz, Stuarten_US
dc.contributor.authorNatarajan, Sundaren_US
dc.contributor.authorGawande, Atulen_US
dc.contributor.authorSinha, Debajyotien_US
dc.contributor.authorGreenberg, Capriceen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiovannucci, Edwarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T17:02:01Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationFitzmaurice, Garrett, Stuart Lipsitz, Sundar Natarajan, Atul Gawande, Debajyoti Sinha, Caprice Greenberg, and Edward Giovannucci. 2014. “Simple Methods of Determining Confidence Intervals for Functions of Estimates in Published Results.” PLoS ONE 9 (5): e98498. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0098498. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0098498.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12406584
dc.description.abstractOften, the reader of a published paper is interested in a comparison of parameters that has not been presented. It is not possible to make inferences beyond point estimation since the standard error for the contrast of the estimated parameters depends upon the (unreported) correlation. This study explores approaches to obtain valid confidence intervals when the correlation is unknown. We illustrate three proposed approaches using data from the National Health Interview Survey. The three approaches include the Bonferroni method and the standard confidence interval assuming (most conservative) or (when the correlation is known to be non-negative). The Bonferroni approach is found to be the most conservative. For the difference in two estimated parameter, the standard confidence interval assuming yields a 95% confidence interval that is approximately 12.5% narrower than the Bonferroni confidence interval; when the correlation is known to be positive, the standard 95% confidence interval assuming is approximately 38% narrower than the Bonferroni. In summary, this article demonstrates simple methods to determine confidence intervals for unreported comparisons. We suggest use of the standard confidence interval assuming if no information is available or if the correlation is known to be non-negative.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0098498en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4037217/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectCancer Epidemiologyen
dc.subjectEpidemiological Methods and Statisticsen
dc.subjectPhysical Sciencesen
dc.subjectMathematicsen
dc.subjectStatistics (Mathematics)en
dc.subjectBiostatisticsen
dc.subjectConfidence Intervalsen
dc.subjectStatistical Methodsen
dc.subjectSurvey Researchen
dc.subjectSurvey Methodsen
dc.titleSimple Methods of Determining Confidence Intervals for Functions of Estimates in Published Resultsen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorGiovannucci, Edwarden_US
dc.date.available2014-07-07T17:02:01Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0098498*
dash.contributor.affiliatedGiovannucci, Edward


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