Asian-White disparities in short sleep duration by industry of employment and occupation in the US: a cross-sectional study

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Asian-White disparities in short sleep duration by industry of employment and occupation in the US: a cross-sectional study

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Title: Asian-White disparities in short sleep duration by industry of employment and occupation in the US: a cross-sectional study
Author: Jackson, Chandra L; Kawachi, Ichiro; Redline, Susan; Juon, Hee-Soon; Hu, Frank B

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Citation: Jackson, Chandra L, Ichiro Kawachi, Susan Redline, Hee-Soon Juon, and Frank B Hu. 2014. “Asian-White disparities in short sleep duration by industry of employment and occupation in the US: a cross-sectional study.” BMC Public Health 14 (1): 552. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-552. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-552.
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Abstract: Background: Although short sleep is associated with an increased risk of morbidity as well as mortality and has been shown to vary by industry of employment and occupation, little is known about the relationship between work and sleep among Asian Americans. Methods: Using a nationally representative sample of US adults (n = 125,610) in the National Health Interview Survey from 2004–2011, we estimated prevalence ratios for self-reported short sleep duration (<7 hours) in Asians compared to Whites by industry of employment and occupation using adjusted Poisson regression models with robust variance. Results: Asians were more likely to report short sleep duration than Whites (33 vs. 28%, p < 0.001), and the Asian-White disparity was widest in finance/information and healthcare industries. Compared to Whites after adjustments, short sleep was also more prevalent among Asians employed in Public administration (PR = 1.35 [95% CI: 1.17,1.56]), Education (PR = 1.29 [95% CI: 1.08,1.53]), and Professional/Management (PR = 1.18 [95% CI: 1.03,1.36]). Short sleep, however, was lower among Asians in Accommodation/Food (PR = 0.81 [95% CI: 0.66, 0.99]) with no difference in Retail. In professional and support-service occupations, short sleep was higher among Asians, but was not different among laborers. Conclusions: U.S. Asian-White disparities in short sleep varied by industries, suggesting a need to consider both race and occupational characteristics to identify high-risk individuals.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-552
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4057824/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12406628
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