Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWallace, Ian J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDemes, Brigitteen_US
dc.contributor.authorMongle, Carrieen_US
dc.contributor.authorPearson, Osbjorn M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPolk, John D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLieberman, Daniel E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T17:02:42Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationWallace, Ian J., Brigitte Demes, Carrie Mongle, Osbjorn M. Pearson, John D. Polk, and Daniel E. Lieberman. 2014. “Exercise-Induced Bone Formation Is Poorly Linked to Local Strain Magnitude in the Sheep Tibia.” PLoS ONE 9 (6): e99108. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0099108. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0099108.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12406631
dc.description.abstractFunctional interpretations of limb bone structure frequently assume that diaphyses adjust their shape by adding bone primarily across the plane in which they are habitually loaded in order to minimize loading-induced strains. Here, to test this hypothesis, we characterize the in vivo strain environment of the sheep tibial midshaft during treadmill exercise and examine whether this activity promotes bone formation disproportionately in the direction of loading in diaphyseal regions that experience the highest strains. It is shown that during treadmill exercise, sheep tibiae were bent in an anteroposterior direction, generating maximal tensile and compressive strains on the anterior and posterior shaft surfaces, respectively. Exercise led to significantly increased periosteal bone formation; however, rather than being biased toward areas of maximal strains across the anteroposterior axis, exercise-related osteogenesis occurred primarily around the medial half of the shaft circumference, in both high and low strain regions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that loading-induced bone growth is not closely linked to local strain magnitude in every instance. Therefore, caution is necessary when bone shaft shape is used to infer functional loading history in the absence of in vivo data on how bones are loaded and how they actually respond to loading.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0099108en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4045900/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectBiology and Life Sciencesen
dc.subjectAnatomyen
dc.subjectMusculoskeletal Systemen
dc.subjectBiomechanicsen
dc.subjectBone and Joint Mechanicsen
dc.subjectBiophysicsen
dc.subjectPaleontologyen
dc.subjectPaleobiologyen
dc.subjectPaleozoologyen
dc.subjectVertebrate Paleontologyen
dc.titleExercise-Induced Bone Formation Is Poorly Linked to Local Strain Magnitude in the Sheep Tibiaen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorLieberman, Daniel E.en_US
dc.date.available2014-07-07T17:02:42Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0099108*
dash.contributor.affiliatedLieberman, Daniel
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-6194-9127


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record