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dc.contributor.authorMatheka, Duncan Mwangangien_US
dc.contributor.authorNderitu, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.authorMutonga, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorOtiti, Mary Iwareten_US
dc.contributor.authorSiegel, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDemaio, Alessandro Rhyllen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T17:03:04Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationMatheka, Duncan Mwangangi, Joseph Nderitu, Daniel Mutonga, Mary Iwaret Otiti, Karen Siegel, and Alessandro Rhyll Demaio. 2014. “Open access: academic publishing and its implications for knowledge equity in Kenya.” Globalization and Health 10 (1): 26. doi:10.1186/1744-8603-10-26. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1744-8603-10-26.en
dc.identifier.issn1744-8603en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12406651
dc.description.abstractTraditional, subscription-based scientific publishing has its limitations: often, articles are inaccessible to the majority of researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where journal subscriptions or one-time access fees are cost-prohibitive. Open access (OA) publishing, in which journals provide online access to articles free of charge, breaks this barrier and allows unrestricted access to scientific and scholarly information to researchers all over the globe. At the same time, one major limitation to OA is a high publishing cost that is placed on authors. Following recent developments to OA publishing policies in the UK and even LMICs, this article highlights the current status and future challenges of OA in Africa. We place particular emphasis on Kenya, where multidisciplinary efforts to improve access have been established. We note that these efforts in Kenya can be further strengthened and potentially replicated in other African countries, with the goal of elevating the visibility of African research and improving access for African researchers to global research, and, ultimately, bring social and economic benefits to the region. We (1) offer recommendations for overcoming the challenges of implementing OA in Africa and (2) call for urgent action by African governments to follow the suit of high-income countries like the UK and Australia, mandating OA for publicly-funded research in their region and supporting future research into how OA might bring social and economic benefits to Africa.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1186/1744-8603-10-26en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4046522/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectTraditional publishingen
dc.subjectOpen accessen
dc.subjectKenyaen
dc.subjectLow- and middle-income countriesen
dc.subjectRepositoriesen
dc.subjectHINARIen
dc.subjectPolicyen
dc.subjectLibrariesen
dc.subjectUniversitiesen
dc.subjectOpen access weeken
dc.titleOpen access: academic publishing and its implications for knowledge equity in Kenyaen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalGlobalization and Healthen
dc.date.available2014-07-07T17:03:04Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1744-8603-10-26*


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