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dc.contributor.authorBeverly, Elizabeth A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Shaneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSitnikov, Lilyaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGanda, Om P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCaballero, A. Enriqueen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeinger, Katieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T17:03:32Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationBeverly, Elizabeth A., Shane Fitzgerald, Lilya Sitnikov, Om P. Ganda, A. Enrique Caballero, and Katie Weinger. 2013. “Do Older Adults Aged 60–75 Years Benefit From Diabetes Behavioral Interventions?” Diabetes Care 36 (6): 1501-1506. doi:10.2337/dc12-2110. http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc12-2110.en
dc.identifier.issn0149-5992en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12406704
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE In this secondary analysis, we examined whether older adults with diabetes (aged 60–75 years) could benefit from self-management interventions compared with younger adults. Seventy-one community-dwelling older adults and 151 younger adults were randomized to attend a structured behavioral group, an attention control group, or one-to-one education. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured A1C, self-care (3-day pedometer readings, blood glucose checks, and frequency of self-care), and psychosocial factors (quality of life, diabetes distress, frustration with self-care, depression, self-efficacy, and coping styles) at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months postintervention. RESULTS Both older (age 67 ± 5 years, A1C 8.7 ± 0.8%, duration 20 ± 12 years, 30% type 1 diabetes, 83% white, 41% female) and younger (age 47 ± 9 years, A1C 9.2 ± 1.2%, 18 ± 12 years with diabetes, 59% type 1 diabetes, 82% white, 55% female) adults had improved A1C equally over time. Importantly, older and younger adults in the group conditions improved more and maintained improvements at 12 months (older structured behavioral group change in A1C −0.72 ± 1.4%, older control group −0.65 ± 0.9%, younger behavioral group −0.55 ± 1.2%, younger control group −0.43 ± 1.7%). Furthermore, frequency of self-care, glucose checks, depressive symptoms, quality of life, distress, frustration with self-care, self-efficacy, and emotional coping improved in older and younger participants at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The findings suggest that, compared with younger adults, older adults receive equal glycemic benefit from participating in self-management interventions. Moreover, older adults showed the greatest glycemic improvement in the two group conditions. Clinicians can safely recommend group diabetes interventions to community-dwelling older adults with poor glycemic control.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherAmerican Diabetes Associationen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.2337/dc12-2110en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3661804/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectClinical Care/Education/Nutrition/Psychosocial Researchen
dc.titleDo Older Adults Aged 60–75 Years Benefit From Diabetes Behavioral Interventions?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalDiabetes Careen
dash.depositing.authorGanda, Om P.en_US
dc.date.available2014-07-07T17:03:32Z
dc.identifier.doi10.2337/dc12-2110*
dash.contributor.affiliatedGanda, Om
dash.contributor.affiliatedWeinger, Katie


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