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dc.contributor.authorAghion, Philippe
dc.contributor.authorHowitt, Peter
dc.contributor.authorViolante†, Giovanni L.
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-11T19:22:15Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationAghion, Philippe, Peter Howitt, and Giovanni L. Violante†. 2002. Journal of Economic Growth 7 (4): 315–345.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1381-4338en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12490369
dc.description.abstractThe recent changes in the US wage structure are often linked to the new wave of capital-embodied information technologies. The existing literature has emphasized either the accelerated pace or the skill-bias of embodied technical progress as the driving force behind the rise in wage inequality. A key, neglected, aspect is the “general purpose” nature of the new information technologies. This paper formalizes the idea of generality of technology in two ways, one related to human capital (skill transferability) and one to physical capital (vintage compatibility) and studies the impact of an increase in these two dimensions of technological generality on equilibrium wage inequality.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEconomicsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Mediaen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1023/A:1020875717066en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.subjectgeneral purpose technology; wage inequality; experience premium; skill transferability; vintage compatibilityen_US
dc.titleGeneral Purpose Technology and Wage Inequalityen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Economic Growthen_US
dash.depositing.authorAghion, Philippe
dc.date.available2014-07-11T19:22:15Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1020875717066*
dash.authorsorderedfalse
dash.contributor.affiliatedAghion, Philippe


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