Memory and law: what can cognitive neuroscience contribute?

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Memory and law: what can cognitive neuroscience contribute?

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Title: Memory and law: what can cognitive neuroscience contribute?
Author: Schacter, Daniel L.; Loftus, Elizabeth F

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Citation: Schacter, Daniel L, and Elizabeth F Loftus. 2013. Memory and Law: What Can Cognitive Neuroscience Contribute? Nature Neuroscience 16(2): 119–123.
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Abstract: A recent decision in the United States by the New Jersey Supreme Court has led to improved jury instructions that incorporate psychological research showing that memory does not operate like a video recording. Here we consider how cognitive neuroscience could contribute to addressing memory in the courtroom. We discuss conditions in which neuroimaging can distinguish true and false memories in the laboratory and note reasons to be skeptical about its use in courtroom cases. We also discuss neuroscience research concerning false and imagined memories, misinformation effects and reconsolidation phenomena that may enhance understanding of why memory does not operate like a video recording.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/nn.3294
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12561406
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