Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDaffner, Kirk R.
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Katherine K.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Danielle M.
dc.contributor.authorBudson, Andrew E.
dc.contributor.authorRentz, Dorene May
dc.contributor.authorWolk, David A.
dc.contributor.authorHolcomb, Phillip J.
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-29T20:00:49Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifierQuick submit: 2014-06-06T10:31:45-04:00
dc.identifier.citationDaffner, Kirk R., Katherine K. Ryan, Danielle M. Williams, Andrew E. Budson, Dorene M. Rentz, David A. Wolk, and Phillip J. Holcomb. 2006. “Increased Responsiveness to Novelty Is Associated with Successful Cognitive Aging.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 18, no. 10: 1759–1773.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0898-929Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12605385
dc.description.abstractThe animal literature suggests that exposure to more complex, novel environments promotes neurogenesis and cognitive performance in older animals. Studies in humans indicate that participation in intellectually stimulating activities may serve as a buffer against mental decline and help to sustain cognitive abilities. Here, we show that across old adults, increased responsiveness to novel events (as measured by viewing duration and the size of the P3 event-related potential) is strongly linked to better performance on neuropsychological tests, especially those involving attention/executive functions. Cognitively high performing old adults generate a larger P3 response to visual stimuli than cognitively average performing adults. These results suggest that cognitively high performing adults successfully manage the task by appropriating more resources and that the increased size of their P3 component represents a beneficial compensatory mechanism rather than less efficient processing.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMIT Press - Journalsen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1162/jocn.2006.18.10.1759en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleIncreased Responsiveness to Novelty is Associated with Successful Cognitive Agingen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.date.updated2014-06-06T14:31:45Z
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dc.rights.holderDaffner,K.R. Ryan,K.K. Williams,D.M Budson,A.E. Rentz,D.M. Wolk,D.A. Holcomb,P.J.
dc.relation.journalJournal of Cognitive Neuroscienceen_US
dash.depositing.authorDaffner, Kirk R.
dc.date.available2014-07-29T20:00:49Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/jocn.2006.18.10.1759*
workflow.legacycommentsPer Sherpa can post pub after 3 month embargo, which has already elapseden_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedBudson, Andrew
dash.contributor.affiliatedRentz, Dorene
dash.contributor.affiliatedDaffner, Kirk


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record