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dc.contributor.authorLangergraber, K.
dc.contributor.authorSchubert, Gary
dc.contributor.authorRowney, C.
dc.contributor.authorWrangham, Richard W.
dc.contributor.authorZommers, Z.
dc.contributor.authorVigilant, L.
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-11T15:40:10Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationLangergraber, K., G. Schubert, C. Rowney, R. Wrangham, Z. Zommers, and L. Vigilant. 2011. Genetic Differentiation and the Evolution of Cooperation in Chimpanzees and Humans. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 278 (1717): 2546–2552.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12712849
dc.description.abstractIt has been proposed that human cooperation is unique among animals for its scale and complexity, its altruistic nature and its occurrence among large groups of individuals that are not closely related or are even strangers. One potential solution to this puzzle is that the unique aspects of human cooperation evolved as a result of high levels of lethal competition (i.e. warfare) between genetically differentiated groups. Although between-group migration would seem to make this scenario unlikely, the plausibility of the between-group competition model has recently been supported by analyses using estimates of genetic differentiation derived from contemporary human groups hypothesized to be representative of those that existed during the time period when human cooperation evolved. Here, we examine levels of between-group genetic differentiation in a large sample of contemporary human groups selected to overcome some of the problems with earlier estimates, and compare them with those of chimpanzees. We find that our estimates of between-group genetic differentiation in contemporary humans are lower than those used in previous tests, and not higher than those of chimpanzees. Because levels of between-group competition in contemporary humans and chimpanzees are also similar, these findings suggest that the identification of other factors that differ between chimpanzees and humans may be needed to provide a compelling explanation of why humans, but not chimpanzees, display the unique features of human cooperation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAnthropologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1098/rspb.2010.2592en_US
dash.licenseOAP
dc.subjectchimpanzeesen_US
dc.subjectPan troqiodytesen_US
dc.subjectgroup competitionen_US
dc.subjecthunter-gathereren_US
dc.subjectaltruismen_US
dc.subjectwarfareen_US
dc.titleGenetic differentiation and the evolution of cooperation in chimpanzees and humansen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.relation.journalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen_US
dash.depositing.authorWrangham, Richard W.
dc.date.available2014-08-11T15:40:10Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2010.2592*
workflow.legacycommentsFAR 2012en_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedSchubert, Gary
dash.contributor.affiliatedWrangham, Richard


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