A New System for the Rapid Collection of Large Numbers of Developmentally Staged Zebrafish Embryos

DSpace/Manakin Repository

A New System for the Rapid Collection of Large Numbers of Developmentally Staged Zebrafish Embryos

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: A New System for the Rapid Collection of Large Numbers of Developmentally Staged Zebrafish Embryos
Author: Adatto, Isaac; Lawrence, Christian; Thompson, Michael; Zon, Leonard Ira

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Adatto, Isaac, Christian Lawrence, Michael Thompson, and Leonard I. Zon. 2011. “A New System for the Rapid Collection of Large Numbers of Developmentally Staged Zebrafish Embryos.” PLoS ONE 6, no. 6: e21715.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: The zebrafish is an excellent genetic and developmental model system used to study biology and disease. While the zebrafish model is associated with high fecundity, its reproductive potential has not been completely realized by scientists. One major issue is that embryo collection is inefficient. Here, we have developed an innovative breeding vessel designed to stimulate the natural reproductive behavior of the fish. This novel apparatus allows us to collect large numbers of developmentally synchronized embryos in brief and defined windows of time, and with minimal investments in labor and space. To demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, we placed three separate groups (n = 180) of fish in the vessel and allowed them to spawn for 10-minute intervals. During these trials, which were repeated three times, the fish produced 86006917, 84006794, and 680061997 embryos, respectively. This level of embryo production is nearly twice what we were able to achieve when using conventional crossing equipment with some of the same fish, and it required significantly less room and time to set up and break down. This system overcomes major space and labor restrictions inherent in spawning equipment currently used in the field, and will greatly accelerate efforts to improve the scale and throughput of experiments.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0021715
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12712867
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters