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dc.contributor.authorFujiwara, Takeoen_US
dc.contributor.authorKawachi, Ichiroen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T13:58:29Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationFujiwara, Takeo, and Ichiro Kawachi. 2014. “Are Maternal Social Networks and Perceptions of Trust Associated with Suspected Autism Spectrum Disorder in Offspring? A Population-Based Study in Japan.” PLoS ONE 9 (7): e101359. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101359. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0101359.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12717409
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate the associations of maternal social networks and perceptions of trust with the prevalence of suspected autism spectrum disorders in 18-month-old offspring in Japan. Methods: Questionnaires included measurements of maternal social networks (number of relatives or friends they could call upon for assistance), maternal perceptions of trust, mutual assistance (i.e. individual measures of “cognitive social capital”), and social participation (i.e. individual measures of “structural social capital”) as well as the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers to detect suspected autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These tools were mailed to all families with 18-month-old toddlers in Chiba, a city near Tokyo (N = 6061; response rate: 64%). The association between social capital or social network indicators and suspected ASD were analyzed, adjusted for covariates by logistic regression analysis. Results: Low maternal social trust was found to be significantly positively associated with suspected ASD in toddlers compared with high maternal social trust (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.82, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.38 to 2.40); mutual aid was also significantly positively related (low vs. high: OR, 1.82, 95% CI: 1.38 to 2.40). However, maternal community participation showed U-shape association with suspected ASD of offspring. Maternal social network showed consistent inverse associations with suspected ASD of offspring, regardless of the type of social connection (e.g., relatives, neighbors, or friends living outside of their neighborhood). Conclusions: Mothers' cognitive social capital and social networks, but not structural social capital, might be associated with suspected ASD in offspring.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101359en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4077823/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectBiology and Life Sciencesen
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen
dc.subjectDevelopmental Neuroscienceen
dc.subjectComputer and Information Sciencesen
dc.subjectNetwork Analysisen
dc.subjectSocial Networksen
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectSocial Epidemiologyen
dc.subjectNeurologyen
dc.subjectDevelopmental and Pediatric Neurologyen
dc.subjectPediatricsen
dc.subjectChild Developmenten
dc.subjectChild Healthen
dc.subjectPublic and Occupational Healthen
dc.subjectBehavioral and Social Aspects of Healthen
dc.subjectClinical Research Designen
dc.subjectSurvey Researchen
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen
dc.subjectSociologyen
dc.titleAre Maternal Social Networks and Perceptions of Trust Associated with Suspected Autism Spectrum Disorder in Offspring? A Population-Based Study in Japanen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorKawachi, Ichiroen_US
dc.date.available2014-08-13T13:58:29Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0101359*
dash.contributor.affiliatedKawachi, Ichiro


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