A tensor-based morphometry analysis of regional differences in brain volume in relation to prenatal alcohol exposure

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A tensor-based morphometry analysis of regional differences in brain volume in relation to prenatal alcohol exposure

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Title: A tensor-based morphometry analysis of regional differences in brain volume in relation to prenatal alcohol exposure
Author: Meintjes, E.M.; Narr, K.L.; der Kouwe, A.J.W. van; Molteno, C.D.; Pirnia, T.; Gutman, B.; Woods, R.P.; Thompson, P.M.; Jacobson, J.L.; Jacobson, S.W.

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Citation: Meintjes, E.M., K.L. Narr, A.J.W. van der Kouwe, C.D. Molteno, T. Pirnia, B. Gutman, R.P. Woods, P.M. Thompson, J.L. Jacobson, and S.W. Jacobson. 2014. “A tensor-based morphometry analysis of regional differences in brain volume in relation to prenatal alcohol exposure.” NeuroImage : Clinical 5 (1): 152-160. doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2014.04.001. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2014.04.001.
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Abstract: Reductions in brain volumes represent a neurobiological signature of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Less clear is how regional brain tissue reductions differ after normalizing for brain size differences linked with FASD and whether these profiles can predict the degree of prenatal exposure to alcohol. To examine associations of regional brain tissue excesses/deficits with degree of prenatal alcohol exposure and diagnosis with and without correction for overall brain volume, tensor-based morphometry (TBM) methods were applied to structural imaging data from a well-characterized, demographically homogeneous sample of children diagnosed with FASD (n = 39, 9.6–11.0 years) and controls (n = 16, 9.5–11.0 years). Degree of prenatal alcohol exposure was significantly associated with regionally pervasive brain tissue reductions in: (1) the thalamus, midbrain, and ventromedial frontal lobe, (2) the superior cerebellum and inferior occipital lobe, (3) the dorsolateral frontal cortex, and (4) the precuneus and superior parietal lobule. When overall brain size was factored out of the analysis on a subject-by-subject basis, no regions showed significant associations with alcohol exposure. FASD diagnosis was associated with a similar deformation pattern, but few of the regions survived FDR correction. In data-driven independent component analyses (ICA) regional brain tissue deformations successfully distinguished individuals based on extent of prenatal alcohol exposure and to a lesser degree, diagnosis. The greater sensitivity of the continuous measure of alcohol exposure compared with the categorical diagnosis across diverse brain regions underscores the dose dependence of these effects. The ICA results illustrate that profiles of brain tissue alterations may be a useful indicator of prenatal alcohol exposure when reliable historical data are not available and facial features are not apparent.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2014.04.001
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4097000/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12717515
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