Links from Mantle to Microbe at the Lau Integrated Study Site: Insights from a Back-Arc Spreading Center

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Links from Mantle to Microbe at the Lau Integrated Study Site: Insights from a Back-Arc Spreading Center

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Links from Mantle to Microbe at the Lau Integrated Study Site: Insights from a Back-Arc Spreading Center
Author: Tivey, Margaret; Becker, Erin; Beinart, Roxanne; Fisher, Charles; Girguis, Peter R.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Michael, Peter; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Tivey, Margaret, Erin Becker, Roxanne Beinart, Charles Fisher, Peter Girguis, Charles Langmuir, Peter Michael, and Anna-Louise Reysenbach. 2012. “Links from Mantle to Microbe at the Lau Integrated Study Site: Insights from a Back-Arc Spreading Center.” Oceanography 25, no. 1: 62–77.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: The Lau Integrated Study Site (ISS) has provided unique opportunities for study of ridge processes because of its back-arc setting in the southwestern Pacific. Its location allows study of a biogeographical province distinct from those of eastern Pacific and mid-Atlantic ridges, and crustal compositions along the ridge lie outside the range of mid-ocean ridge crustal compositions. The Lau ISS is located above a subduction zone, at an oblique angle. The underlying mantle receives water and other elements derived from the downgoing lithospheric slab, with an increase in slab influence from north to south. Water lowers the mantle melting temperature and leads to greater melt production where the water flux is greater, and to distinctive regional-scale gradients along the ridge. There are deeper faulted axial valleys with basaltic volcanism in the north and inflated axial highs with andesites in the south. Differences in igneous rock composition and release of magmatic volatiles affect compositions of vent fluids and deposits. Differences in vent fluid compositions and small-scale diffuse-flow regimes correlate with regional-scale patterns in microbial and megafaunal distributions. The interdisciplinary research effort at the Lau ISS has successfully identified linkages between subsurface processes and deep-sea biological communities, from mantle to microbe to megafauna.
Published Version: doi:10.5670/oceanog.2012.04
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12763598
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters