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dc.contributor.authorThériault, François L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMaheu-Giroux, Mathieuen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlouin, Brittanyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCasapía, Martinen_US
dc.contributor.authorGyorkos, Theresa W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-08T15:36:08Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThériault, François L., Mathieu Maheu-Giroux, Brittany Blouin, Martin Casapía, and Theresa W. Gyorkos. 2014. “Effects of a Post-Deworming Health Hygiene Education Intervention on Absenteeism in School-Age Children of the Peruvian Amazon.” PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 8 (8): e3007. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003007. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003007.en
dc.identifier.issn1935-2727en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12785826
dc.description.abstractSoil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are a leading cause of disability and disease burden in school-age children of worm-endemic regions. Their effect on school absenteeism, however, remains unclear. The World Health Organization currently recommends delivering mass deworming and health hygiene education through school-based programs, in an effort to control STH-related morbidity. In this cluster-RCT, the impact of a health hygiene education intervention on absenteeism was measured. From April to June 2010, all Grade 5 students at 18 schools in a worm-endemic region of the Peruvian Amazon were dewormed. Immediately following deworming, nine schools were randomly assigned to the intervention arm of the trial using a matched-pair design. The Grade 5 students attending intervention schools (N = 517) received four months of health hygiene education aimed at increasing knowledge of STH prevention. Grade 5 students from the other nine schools (N = 571) served as controls. Absenteeism was measured daily through teachers' attendance logs. After four months of follow-up, overall absenteeism rates at intervention and control schools were not statistically significantly different. However, post-trial non-randomized analyses have shown that students with moderate-to-heavy Ascaris infections and light hookworm infections four months after deworming had, respectively, missed 2.4% (95% CI: 0.1%, 4.7%) and 4.6% (95% CI: 1.9%, 7.4%) more schooldays during the follow-up period than their uninfected counterparts. These results provide empirical evidence of a direct effect of STH infections on absenteeism in school-age children.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003007en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4133165/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectInfectious Diseasesen
dc.subjectParasitic Diseasesen
dc.subjectHelminth Infectionsen
dc.subjectSoil-Transmitted Helminthiasesen
dc.subjectAscariasisen
dc.subjectHookworm Diseasesen
dc.subjectTrichuriasisen
dc.subjectPediatricsen
dc.subjectPublic and Occupational Healthen
dc.subjectGlobal Healthen
dc.subjectTropical Diseasesen
dc.subjectNeglected Tropical Diseasesen
dc.titleEffects of a Post-Deworming Health Hygiene Education Intervention on Absenteeism in School-Age Children of the Peruvian Amazonen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen
dc.date.available2014-09-08T15:36:08Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0003007*


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