Funding Infectious Disease Research: A Systematic Analysis of UK Research Investments by Funders 1997–2010

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Funding Infectious Disease Research: A Systematic Analysis of UK Research Investments by Funders 1997–2010

Citable link to this page

 

 
Title: Funding Infectious Disease Research: A Systematic Analysis of UK Research Investments by Funders 1997–2010
Author: Fitchett, Joseph R.; Head, Michael G.; Cooke, Mary K.; Wurie, Fatima B.; Atun, Rifat

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Fitchett, Joseph R., Michael G. Head, Mary K. Cooke, Fatima B. Wurie, and Rifat Atun. 2014. “Funding Infectious Disease Research: A Systematic Analysis of UK Research Investments by Funders 1997–2010.” PLoS ONE 9 (8): e105722. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0105722. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0105722.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Background: Research investments are essential to address the burden of disease, however allocation of limited resources is poorly documented. We systematically reviewed the investments awarded by funding organisations to UK institutions and their global partners for infectious disease research. Methodology/Principal Findings Public and philanthropic investments for the period 1997 to 2010 were included. We categorised studies by infectious disease, cross-cutting theme, and by research and development value chain, reflecting the type of science. We identified 6165 funded studies, with a total research investment of UK £2.6 billion. Public organisations provided £1.4 billion (54.0%) of investments compared with £1.1 billion (42.4%) by philanthropic organisations. Global health studies represented an investment of £928 million (35.7%). The Wellcome Trust was the leading investor with £688 million (26.5%), closely followed by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) with £673 million (25.9%). Funding over time was volatile, ranging from ∼£40 million to ∼£160 million per year for philanthropic organisations and ∼£30 million to ∼£230 million for public funders. Conclusions/Significance: Infectious disease research funding requires global coordination and strategic long-term vision. Our analysis demonstrates the diversity and inconsistent patterns in investment, with volatility in annual funding amounts and limited investment for product development and clinical trials.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0105722
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4146508/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12785831
Downloads of this work:

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters