Nutritional improvement following growing rod surgery in children with early onset scoliosis

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Nutritional improvement following growing rod surgery in children with early onset scoliosis

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Title: Nutritional improvement following growing rod surgery in children with early onset scoliosis
Author: Myung, Karen S.; Skaggs, David L.; Thompson, George H.; Emans, John B.; Akbarnia, Behrooz A.

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Citation: Myung, Karen S., David L. Skaggs, George H. Thompson, John B. Emans, and Behrooz A. Akbarnia. 2014. “Nutritional improvement following growing rod surgery in children with early onset scoliosis.” Journal of Children's Orthopaedics 8 (3): 251-256. doi:10.1007/s11832-014-0586-z. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11832-014-0586-z.
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Abstract: Purpose We aimed to evaluate the nutritional status of children with early onset scoliosis (EOS) and to determine if treatment with growing rod instrumentation improves weight percentile. Methods: Data was retrospectively collected on 88 EOS patients treated with growing rods at six institutions. Mean age at surgery was 5.8 years, and mean Cobb angle was 75°. All patients were followed for at least 2 years (mean 4 years). Weights were converted to normative percentiles based on the patients’ age and gender. Results: Preoperatively, 47 % (41/88) of patients were <5 percentile for weight, thus failing to thrive. There was a significant increase in mean postoperative weight percentiles at latest follow-up (p = 0.004). 49 % of patients gained weight, with a mean of 18 percentile. A significant relationship exists between age at initial surgery and percentile weight gain (p < 0.005), with children <4 years old not demonstrating postoperative improvement. This relationship was not confounded by preoperative weight, preoperative Cobb angle, or years of follow-up (p > 0.05). Children with neuromuscular and syndromic diagnoses do not appear to improve their mean nutritional status after surgery when compared to patients with idiopathic or congenital/structural scoliosis (p = 0.006). Conclusion: Following growing rod treatment, there was significant improvement in nutritional status in approximately 50 % of patients, similar to that reported with VEPTR. Neuromuscular and syndromic patients did not experience nutritional improvement post-operatively. These findings support the theory that growing rods improve the clinical status of EOS patients, as nutritional improvement is one outcome of improved clinical status. The relationship between age at initial surgery and nutritional improvement is intriguing.
Published Version: doi:10.1007/s11832-014-0586-z
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142888/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12785916
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