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dc.contributor.authorSunstein, Cass Robert
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-08T16:26:02Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationCass R. Sunstein, Social and Economic Rights? Lessons from South Africa (John M. Olin Program in L. & Econ., Working Paper No. 124, 2001).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12785996
dc.description.abstractDo social and economic rights belong in a democratic constitution? Skeptics have wondered whether it is possible to constitutionalize such rights without imposing an untenable managerial responsibility on courts. In an extraordinary decision, the Constitutional Court of South Africa has provided a new approach to social and economic rights, one that respects the fact of limited resources while also requiring governmental attention to basic needs. This new approach might be called an administrative law model of constitutional rights. It contains considerable promise, because it recognize rights to reasonable programs, rather than to protection of each individual, a path that might well be beyond governmental capacities.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://chicagounbound.uchicago.edu/law_and_economics/455/en_US
dash.licenseLAA
dc.titleSocial and Economic Rights? Lessons from South Africaen_US
dc.typeResearch Paper or Reporten_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden_US
dash.depositing.authorSunstein, Cass Robert
dc.date.available2014-09-08T16:26:02Z
workflow.legacycommentsDFen_US
dash.contributor.affiliatedSunstein, Cass


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