Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPuett, Robin C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHart, Jaime E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYanosky, Jeff D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSpiegelman, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Molinen_US
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Jared A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHong, Bilingen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaden, Francineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-01T14:27:47Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationPuett, Robin C., Jaime E. Hart, Jeff D. Yanosky, Donna Spiegelman, Molin Wang, Jared A. Fisher, Biling Hong, and Francine Laden. 2014. “Particulate Matter Air Pollution Exposure, Distance to Road, and Incident Lung Cancer in the Nurses’ Health Study Cohort.” Environmental Health Perspectives 122 (9): 926-932. doi:10.1289/ehp.1307490. http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307490.en
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12987238
dc.description.abstractBackground: A body of literature has suggested an elevated risk of lung cancer associated with particulate matter and traffic-related pollutants. Objective: We examined the relation of lung cancer incidence with long-term residential exposures to ambient particulate matter and residential distance to roadway, as a proxy for traffic-related exposures. Methods: For participants in the Nurses’ Health Study, a nationwide prospective cohort of women, we estimated 72-month average exposures to PM2.5, PM2.5–10, and PM10 and residential distance to road. Follow-up for incident cases of lung cancer occurred from 1994 through 2010. Cox proportional hazards models were adjusted for potential confounders. Effect modification by smoking status was examined. Results: During 1,510,027 person-years, 2,155 incident cases of lung cancer were observed among 103,650 participants. In fully adjusted models, a 10-μg/m3 increase in 72-month average PM10 [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.14], PM2.5 (HR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.91, 1.25), or PM2.5–10 (HR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.92, 1.20) was positively associated with lung cancer. When the cohort was restricted to never-smokers and to former smokers who had quit at least 10 years before, the associations appeared to increase and were strongest for PM2.5 (PM10: HR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.32; PM2.5: HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.77; PM2.5–10: HR = 1.11; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.37). Results were most elevated when restricted to the most prevalent subtype, adenocarcinomas. Risks with roadway proximity were less consistent. Conclusions: Our findings support those from other studies indicating increased risk of incident lung cancer associated with ambient PM exposures, especially among never- and long-term former smokers. Citation: Puett RC, Hart JE, Yanosky JD, Spiegelman D, Wang M, Fisher JA, Hong B, Laden F. 2014. Particulate matter air pollution exposure, distance to road, and incident lung cancer in the Nurses’ Health Study Cohort. Environ Health Perspect 122:926–932; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307490en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherNLM-Exporten
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1289/ehp.1307490en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4154215/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.titleParticulate Matter Air Pollution Exposure, Distance to Road, and Incident Lung Cancer in the Nurses’ Health Study Cohorten
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalEnvironmental Health Perspectivesen
dash.depositing.authorHart, Jaime E.en_US
dc.date.available2014-10-01T14:27:47Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1289/ehp.1307490*
dash.contributor.affiliatedWang, Molin
dash.contributor.affiliatedHart, Jaime
dash.contributor.affiliatedLaden, Francine


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record