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dc.contributor.authorHsieh, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorKong, Jianen_US
dc.contributor.authorKirsch, Irvingen_US
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Robert R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Karin B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaptchuk, Ted J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGollub, Randy L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-01T14:28:51Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationHsieh, Christine, Jian Kong, Irving Kirsch, Robert R. Edwards, Karin B. Jensen, Ted J. Kaptchuk, and Randy L. Gollub. 2014. “Well-Loved Music Robustly Relieves Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.” PLoS ONE 9 (9): e107390. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0107390. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0107390.en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12987324
dc.description.abstractMusic has pain-relieving effects, but its mechanisms remain unclear. We sought to verify previously studied analgesic components and further elucidate the underpinnings of music analgesia. Using a well-characterized conditioning-enhanced placebo model, we examined whether boosting expectations would enhance or interfere with analgesia from strongly preferred music. A two-session experiment was performed with 48 healthy, pain experiment-naïve participants. In a first cohort, 36 were randomized into 3 treatment groups, including music enhanced with positive expectancy, non-musical sound enhanced with positive expectancy, and no expectancy enhancement. A separate replication cohort of 12 participants received only expectancy-enhanced music following the main experiment to verify the results of expectancy-manipulation on music. Primary outcome measures included the change in subjective pain ratings to calibrated experimental noxious heat stimuli, as well as changes in treatment expectations. Without conditioning, expectations were strongly in favor of music compared to non-musical sound. While measured expectations were enhanced by conditioning, this failed to affect either music or sound analgesia significantly. Strongly preferred music on its own was as pain relieving as conditioning-enhanced strongly preferred music, and more analgesic than enhanced sound. Our results demonstrate the pain-relieving power of personal music even over enhanced expectations. Trial Information Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01835275.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.isversionofdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0107390en
dc.relation.hasversionhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4161415/pdf/en
dash.licenseLAAen_US
dc.subjectBiology and Life Sciencesen
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen
dc.subjectCognitive Scienceen
dc.subjectCognitive Psychologyen
dc.subjectAttentionen
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subjectNeuropsychologyen
dc.subjectSensory Perceptionen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectBehavioren
dc.subjectClinical Psychologyen
dc.subjectEmotionsen
dc.subjectMedicine and Health Sciencesen
dc.subjectComplementary and Alternative Medicineen
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen
dc.titleWell-Loved Music Robustly Relieves Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Trialen
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.versionVersion of Recorden
dc.relation.journalPLoS ONEen
dash.depositing.authorKong, Jianen_US
dc.date.available2014-10-01T14:28:51Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0107390*
dash.contributor.affiliatedJensen, Karin B.
dash.contributor.affiliatedKong, Jian
dash.contributor.affiliatedGollub, Randy
dash.contributor.affiliatedKaptchuk, Ted
dash.contributor.affiliatedKirsch, Irving
dash.contributor.affiliatedEdwards, Robert


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