LOW-INCOME, MINORITY FATHERS’ CONTROL STRATEGIES AND THEIR CHILDREN'S REGULATORY SKILLS

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LOW-INCOME, MINORITY FATHERS’ CONTROL STRATEGIES AND THEIR CHILDREN'S REGULATORY SKILLS

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Title: LOW-INCOME, MINORITY FATHERS’ CONTROL STRATEGIES AND THEIR CHILDREN'S REGULATORY SKILLS
Author: Malin, Jenessa L.; Cabrera, Natasha J.; Karberg, Elizabeth; Aldoney, Daniela; Rowe, Meredith Lee

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Malin, Jenessa L., Natasha J. Cabrera, Elizabeth Karberg, Daniela Aldoney, and Meredith L. Rowe. 2014. “LOW-INCOME, MINORITY FATHERS’ CONTROL STRATEGIES AND THEIR CHILDREN’S REGULATORY SKILLS.” Infant Mental Health Journal. 35 (5) (August 27): 462–472.
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Abstract: The current study explored the bidirectional association of children’s individual characteristics, fathers’ control strategies at 24 months,
and children’s regulatory skills at prekindergarten (pre-K). Using a sample of low-income, minority families with 2-year-olds from the Early Head
Start Research and Evaluation Project (n = 71), we assessed the association between child gender and vocabulary skills, fathers’ control strategies
at 24 months (e.g., regulatory behavior and regulatory language), and children’s sustained attention and emotion regulation at prekindergarten. There
were three main findings. First, fathers overwhelmingly used commands (e.g., “Do that.”) to promote compliance in their 24-month-old children.
Second, children’s vocabulary skills predicted fathers’ regulatory behaviors during a father–child interaction whereas children’s gender predicted
fathers’ regulatory language during an interaction. Third, controlling for maternal supportiveness, fathers’ regulatory behaviors at 24 months predicted
children’s sustained attention at pre-K whereas fathers’ regulatory language at 24 months predicted children’s emotion regulation at pre-K. Our findings
highlight the importance of examining paternal contributions to children’s regulatory skills.
Published Version: doi:10.1002/imhj.21467
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:13041202
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